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5 States (And One City) Ready to Legalize Marijuana

Source: David McNew/Getty Images

David McNew/Getty Images

It’s an interesting time to stand on the sidelines and watch marijuana legalization efforts take over the country. Colorado and Washington both jumped the gun and passed initiatives to decriminalize and legalize cannabis by popular vote in 2012, and since then have both opened the first legal marijuana markets in the U.S. Legal retail sales began this year, and so far things have settled into place, and the novelty has started to wear off to some degree.

But many other states are following Washington and Colorado’s path, getting closer and closer to legalization every election cycle. So far, legalization advocates have had to rely on voter-backed initiatives to get legislation passed, as the federal government seems as though it still won’t budge on reclassifying cannabis out of its current schedule -1 status. Local governments across the country have taken baby steps towards ending prohibition, with many cities passing ordinances that either have decriminalized small amounts of marijuana or marked them as a lowest priority for law enforcement officials.

Many people are still struggling with the concept of legalized marijuana. For decades and generations, Americans grew accustomed to knowing marijuana as a powerful and dangerous drug — one that could lead to deaths and criminal behavior if it was allowed in their community. The past decade has really opened up a lot of people’s eyes to the facts, which almost wholly dismiss those worries. The medical marijuana communities in several states have also shown the immense benefits cannabis can have for the sick, which is one of many factors that have led to a seismic shift in public opinion regarding marijuana legalization.

As time marches forward, more states are preparing for coming marijuana legalization initiatives, either derived from state legislators or from citizens themselves. A few states have gotten close in the past, but so far only Colorado and Washington have been able to pull through. That doesn’t mean that several others aren’t on the cusp, however.

Here are six states that are the closest to legalizing marijuana for recreational use in the near future, hot on the heels of Washington and Colorado.

Quinn signs law allow study of industrial hemp | FOX2now.com


Marijuana plant

Marijuana plant

CHICAGO (AP) _ Gov. Pat Quinn has signed a law allowing universities and the Illinois Department of Agriculture to study industrial hemp.

The Chicago Democrat signed the measure Tuesday creating a pilot program.

Industrial hemp is in the same species as marijuana but has a negligible amount of marijuana’s active ingredient. Hemp can be used in the production of plastics, fuel, textiles and food.

The Illinois law says an institution of higher education or the state’s Agriculture Department can study the growth, cultivation and marketing of hemp. Those wanting to participate have to notify the state and local law enforcement and provide reports to the state.

Several other states have similar programs.

Illinois’ law takes effect in January.

The state approved a plan legalizing medical marijuana last year.

Cannabis Classroom: A Brief Overview Of Canna…Medical Jane

In a recent study titled “Effect of Marijuana Use on Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury” and published in The American Surgeon, researchers found that patients who had detectable levels of THC in their bodies were less likely than those who did not to die as a result of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The retrospective study examined the data of 446 cases of TBI over a three year period, involving patients who had been treated at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA.

THC Helps Prevent Death Resulting From Traumatic Brain Injury

mmj symbolOverall, 18.4% of TBI patients in the sample had toxicology reports positive for the presence of THC, and the death rate for all cases examined was 9.9%. After adjusting for differences that may confound results (such as age, gender, and classification of injury), the death rate for TBI patients with THC-negative toxicology reports (i.e. without detectable levels of THC in their body) was 11.5%, but for TBI patients with THC-positive reports was only 2.4%. Therefore, the survival of THC-positive TBI patients was approximately 80 times more than the survival of THC-negative TBI patients.

Interpretation Of The Study’s Results

The fact that this was a retrospective analysis, as opposed to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, limits the ability to determine a cause-effect relationship from the study (i.e. it cannot be determined from this study alone that THC is the direct cause of the decreased rate of death from TBI). Additionally, the frequency of cannabis use of the THC-positive patients and the method of delivery used by the TBI patients (e.g. smoking, vaporizing, ingesting) was unknown.

“…therefore, the survival of THC-positive TBI patients was approximately 80 times more than the survival of THC-negative TBI patients.”

According to a Reuters article on the study, “One concern with the study, according to [Dr. David] Plurad (one of the study’s authors), is that the test for THC could not distinguish between occasional and regular users. A person could test positive after having used marijuana days or even weeks before.” This is largely due to the fact that THC is fat-soluble, and can therefore accumulate in your fat cells instead of being immediately excreted by the body, like water-soluble compounds.

Plurad also states that while similar studies conducted in the past found that alcohol was protective from TBI death, the presence/absence of THC in these studies was not controlled for. Therefore, the potential exists (“potential” being the key word) that the patients who had detectable levels of alcohol in their body in these studies also had THC in their system, which is what actually led to the neuroprotective results. Because of this, the validity of these past studies’ results may be limited. Additionally, the researchers in the currently reviewed study also examined the effect of alcohol on TBI death rate, and found that “[alcohol] didn’t turn out to be as protective as the presence of the marijuana”.

More Evidence for Utility of Cannabinoid-Based Medicines

While the results of this study do not definitively prove that the use of cannabis (at levels resulting in physiologically detectable levels of THC) will help to prevent death in the case of a traumatic brain injury, they do lend to a growing body of evidence that endogenous cannabinoids (i.e. those occurring naturally in our bodies, such as 2-AG) and exogenous cannabinoids (e.g. those found in the cannabis plant, or synthetic forms) may prevent or halt brain injury, even in infants.

neuroFor instance, a 2013 study published in Neuropharmacology found that when administered to piglets who had sustained hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (i.e. caused by low oxygen), CBD (cannabidiol), one of the most frequently occurring compounds in cannabis, ”exerts robust neuroprotective effects… modulating excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation.”

A 2001 study published in Nature found that administration of 2-AG to mice that had sustained closed head injury prevented “secondary injury” that follows the primary closed head injury (e.g. it reduced the occurrence of brain edema, decreased size of the area of damage and death of cells in the hippocampus [an area of the brain involved in memory]) and improved recovery. According to an abcNEWS article on the study, “The cannabinoid, 2-AG, is believed to work in three ways. First, it reduces the levels of glutamate, a toxic molecule, released after injury. Second, it decreases the amount of free radicals and TNF (a chemical that induces inflammation) after injury. Third, it increases the blood supply to the brain. All three mechanisms are essential for limiting the damage done after the primary injury.”

In a 2006 study published in found that dexanabinol, a synthetic cannabinoid derivative, while found to be safe, was not effective in treating TBI (dexanabinol does not produce the intoxication caused by cannabis strains with psychoactive levels of THC because instead of binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors, it functions by blocking NMDA/glutamate receptors and neutralizing free radicals which can damage the body).

All of these findings signify a need for increased research into the effects of THC and other naturally occurring and synthetic cannabinoids on brain injury and as general neuroprotective agents, which may have roles in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like ALS, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and others.

Whole Plant vs. Isolated/Synthetic Cannabinoid Medicine

It is important to note that patients with the disorders described in this article should not necessarily expect prevention/improvement of brain injury through the use of raw, whole-plant cannabinoid medicine. More evidence needs to be gathered and large-scale clinical trials need to be conducted before it can be stated definitively that cannabis or its components, synthetic or natural, are effective treatment options for any type of brain injury.

Take Action To Increase Cannabinoid Research In The USA

If you support federal reclassification of cannabis, which can lead to an increase in research and increased safe access to medical cannabis for patients, please visit this site, click “Support”, and follow the steps to notify your Representative that you support H.R. 689, “The States’ Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act”. Your voice matters.

Stay tuned for an upcoming tutorial-style article on Medical Jane which will review the potential utility of cannabinoid medicine as treatment for various neurodegenerative diseases and their symptoms.

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

Marijuana-Spirituality2

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst

Medical Marijuana in Florida: What Amendment 2 Means to You

medicalmarijuana_flickrcc_dankdepot.jpgPhoto by Dank Depot | Flickr CCDo you like smoking weed? I do. At the moment, though, as you may know if you’ve ever been pulled over and swallowed a roach or hidden a sack in your sock, marijuana is a Schedule I drug, meaning the DEA lists it in the top tier of dangerous drugs right along with narcotics like heroin. It’s worth noting that cocaine is a Schedule II drug and that this scheduling scale is closely linked to the severity of sentencing in drug cases.

Marijuana, however, is the interesting exception in its class in that it is the only Schedule I drug that has been legalized in multiple states, with some, like California, allowing it only for medicinal use, while others, such as Colorado, have opted for full-on legalization. And next month, the Sunshine State might become one of the newest states to adopt such a policy regarding marijuana, depending upon what happens with Amendment 2.

But before you start feeding the grinder, let’s hunker down and talk some numbers and what they mean. How likely is this amendment to pass come Election Day? What does it mean if Florida becomes the first Southern state to pass a medical marijuana amendment, and what does it mean if it doesn’t? And what precisely does this amendment say in the first place?

See also: Eight Best Places to Go Stoned in Miami

What in hell does this amendment say, anyway?
Amendment 2 would make medical marijuana legal in Florida. The letter of the law would be that doctors could issue certifications for medical marijuana to people with “conditions for which a physician believes that the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the potential health risks for a patient.” Think California: medical cards and medical dispensaries with taxation and regulation.

One of the possible distinctions between Florida’s amendment and the example of California and its statute is that Florida’s Department of Health is very keen on regulating medical marijuana — from the doctor’s office to the dispensary — much more tightly than it’s regulated in California. That means it’ll likely be a bit tougher than simply walking into your general practitioner’s office and saying you have a recurring headache (chronic headache would almost definitely be too thinly veiled) to get a card. It also means there will probably be significantly stricter zoning laws regarding the distance between schools and dispensaries, so don’t expect to be able to pick up a quarter-ounce on Washington Avenue across the street from Fienberg-Fisher or anywhere near any other elementary, middle, or high school.

How likely is it that medical marijuana will be heading to a dispensary near you?
Well, that’s become a trickier question to answer of late. Over the past year, polls have shown up to 88 percent of voters in favor of the measure, but as the gubernatorial race has heated up and Florida’s political landscape has grown increasingly divided, the numbers have been sliding closer to the margin of error. One of the more recent polls conducted by the Graham Center at the University of Florida had the voters split 48-44 in favor of the amendment, and because it’s a constitutional amendment rather than a regular old bill, it’ll need at least 60 percent of the vote to pass.

5 States (And One City) Ready to Legalize Marijuana

Source: David McNew/Getty Images

David McNew/Getty Images

It’s an interesting time to stand on the sidelines and watch marijuana legalization efforts take over the country. Colorado and Washington both jumped the gun and passed initiatives to decriminalize and legalize cannabis by popular vote in 2012, and since then have both opened the first legal marijuana markets in the U.S. Legal retail sales began this year, and so far things have settled into place, and the novelty has started to wear off to some degree.

But many other states are following Washington and Colorado’s path, getting closer and closer to legalization every election cycle. So far, legalization advocates have had to rely on voter-backed initiatives to get legislation passed, as the federal government seems as though it still won’t budge on reclassifying cannabis out of its current schedule -1 status. Local governments across the country have taken baby steps towards ending prohibition, with many cities passing ordinances that either have decriminalized small amounts of marijuana or marked them as a lowest priority for law enforcement officials.

Many people are still struggling with the concept of legalized marijuana. For decades and generations, Americans grew accustomed to knowing marijuana as a powerful and dangerous drug — one that could lead to deaths and criminal behavior if it was allowed in their community. The past decade has really opened up a lot of people’s eyes to the facts, which almost wholly dismiss those worries. The medical marijuana communities in several states have also shown the immense benefits cannabis can have for the sick, which is one of many factors that have led to a seismic shift in public opinion regarding marijuana legalization.

As time marches forward, more states are preparing for coming marijuana legalization initiatives, either derived from state legislators or from citizens themselves. A few states have gotten close in the past, but so far only Colorado and Washington have been able to pull through. That doesn’t mean that several others aren’t on the cusp, however.

Here are six states that are the closest to legalizing marijuana for recreational use in the near future, hot on the heels of Washington and Colorado.

Quinn signs law allow study of industrial hemp | FOX2now.com


Marijuana plant

Marijuana plant

CHICAGO (AP) _ Gov. Pat Quinn has signed a law allowing universities and the Illinois Department of Agriculture to study industrial hemp.

The Chicago Democrat signed the measure Tuesday creating a pilot program.

Industrial hemp is in the same species as marijuana but has a negligible amount of marijuana’s active ingredient. Hemp can be used in the production of plastics, fuel, textiles and food.

The Illinois law says an institution of higher education or the state’s Agriculture Department can study the growth, cultivation and marketing of hemp. Those wanting to participate have to notify the state and local law enforcement and provide reports to the state.

Several other states have similar programs.

Illinois’ law takes effect in January.

The state approved a plan legalizing medical marijuana last year.

Cannabis Classroom: A Brief Overview Of Canna…Medical Jane

In a recent study titled “Effect of Marijuana Use on Outcomes in Traumatic Brain Injury” and published in The American Surgeon, researchers found that patients who had detectable levels of THC in their bodies were less likely than those who did not to die as a result of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The retrospective study examined the data of 446 cases of TBI over a three year period, involving patients who had been treated at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA.

THC Helps Prevent Death Resulting From Traumatic Brain Injury

mmj symbolOverall, 18.4% of TBI patients in the sample had toxicology reports positive for the presence of THC, and the death rate for all cases examined was 9.9%. After adjusting for differences that may confound results (such as age, gender, and classification of injury), the death rate for TBI patients with THC-negative toxicology reports (i.e. without detectable levels of THC in their body) was 11.5%, but for TBI patients with THC-positive reports was only 2.4%. Therefore, the survival of THC-positive TBI patients was approximately 80 times more than the survival of THC-negative TBI patients.

Interpretation Of The Study’s Results

The fact that this was a retrospective analysis, as opposed to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, limits the ability to determine a cause-effect relationship from the study (i.e. it cannot be determined from this study alone that THC is the direct cause of the decreased rate of death from TBI). Additionally, the frequency of cannabis use of the THC-positive patients and the method of delivery used by the TBI patients (e.g. smoking, vaporizing, ingesting) was unknown.

“…therefore, the survival of THC-positive TBI patients was approximately 80 times more than the survival of THC-negative TBI patients.”

According to a Reuters article on the study, “One concern with the study, according to [Dr. David] Plurad (one of the study’s authors), is that the test for THC could not distinguish between occasional and regular users. A person could test positive after having used marijuana days or even weeks before.” This is largely due to the fact that THC is fat-soluble, and can therefore accumulate in your fat cells instead of being immediately excreted by the body, like water-soluble compounds.

Plurad also states that while similar studies conducted in the past found that alcohol was protective from TBI death, the presence/absence of THC in these studies was not controlled for. Therefore, the potential exists (“potential” being the key word) that the patients who had detectable levels of alcohol in their body in these studies also had THC in their system, which is what actually led to the neuroprotective results. Because of this, the validity of these past studies’ results may be limited. Additionally, the researchers in the currently reviewed study also examined the effect of alcohol on TBI death rate, and found that “[alcohol] didn’t turn out to be as protective as the presence of the marijuana”.

More Evidence for Utility of Cannabinoid-Based Medicines

While the results of this study do not definitively prove that the use of cannabis (at levels resulting in physiologically detectable levels of THC) will help to prevent death in the case of a traumatic brain injury, they do lend to a growing body of evidence that endogenous cannabinoids (i.e. those occurring naturally in our bodies, such as 2-AG) and exogenous cannabinoids (e.g. those found in the cannabis plant, or synthetic forms) may prevent or halt brain injury, even in infants.

neuroFor instance, a 2013 study published in Neuropharmacology found that when administered to piglets who had sustained hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (i.e. caused by low oxygen), CBD (cannabidiol), one of the most frequently occurring compounds in cannabis, ”exerts robust neuroprotective effects… modulating excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation.”

A 2001 study published in Nature found that administration of 2-AG to mice that had sustained closed head injury prevented “secondary injury” that follows the primary closed head injury (e.g. it reduced the occurrence of brain edema, decreased size of the area of damage and death of cells in the hippocampus [an area of the brain involved in memory]) and improved recovery. According to an abcNEWS article on the study, “The cannabinoid, 2-AG, is believed to work in three ways. First, it reduces the levels of glutamate, a toxic molecule, released after injury. Second, it decreases the amount of free radicals and TNF (a chemical that induces inflammation) after injury. Third, it increases the blood supply to the brain. All three mechanisms are essential for limiting the damage done after the primary injury.”

In a 2006 study published in found that dexanabinol, a synthetic cannabinoid derivative, while found to be safe, was not effective in treating TBI (dexanabinol does not produce the intoxication caused by cannabis strains with psychoactive levels of THC because instead of binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors, it functions by blocking NMDA/glutamate receptors and neutralizing free radicals which can damage the body).

All of these findings signify a need for increased research into the effects of THC and other naturally occurring and synthetic cannabinoids on brain injury and as general neuroprotective agents, which may have roles in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like ALS, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and others.

Whole Plant vs. Isolated/Synthetic Cannabinoid Medicine

It is important to note that patients with the disorders described in this article should not necessarily expect prevention/improvement of brain injury through the use of raw, whole-plant cannabinoid medicine. More evidence needs to be gathered and large-scale clinical trials need to be conducted before it can be stated definitively that cannabis or its components, synthetic or natural, are effective treatment options for any type of brain injury.

Take Action To Increase Cannabinoid Research In The USA

If you support federal reclassification of cannabis, which can lead to an increase in research and increased safe access to medical cannabis for patients, please visit this site, click “Support”, and follow the steps to notify your Representative that you support H.R. 689, “The States’ Medical Marijuana Patient Protection Act”. Your voice matters.

Stay tuned for an upcoming tutorial-style article on Medical Jane which will review the potential utility of cannabinoid medicine as treatment for various neurodegenerative diseases and their symptoms.

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

Marijuana-Spirituality2

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

Marijuana-Spirituality2

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

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Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst