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Industrial hemp could be big business in Washington | Weed Blog

Sandy Soderberg, president of Evergreen Hemp Co., thinks Whatcom County could be the epicenter of Washington’s next billion-dollar industry: hemp.

Soderberg hosted an informative session on industrial hemp at her Semiahmoo residence July 26. Experts and politicians were in attendance, as well as a few people who were just curious about what this plant can do.

One thing hemp can’t do is get you stoned, unlike its notorious cousin. Formally known as cannabis sativa, hemp is closely related to marijuana but doesn’t cause intoxication when smoked. Instead, it is used in dozens of more practical applications. Its fibers have been used in ropes and textiles for millennia, and modern builders have found innovative ways to use it as a building material. Its seeds are used in foods and pharmaceuticals. Hemp oil is an ideal biofuel, and the plant’s ability to pull toxins out of soil makes it handy for superfund cleanup sites.

“There’s an old song that goes, ‘anything you can do I can do better,’ – that applies to hemp,” said Bob Burr, a candidate for Bellingham City Council. “You name it, industrial hemp does it. Building materials, fabrics, fuels – it’s a hearty crop and could be a viable industry anywhere. It’s a no-brainer.”

Kevin Hodge, president of HempAdobe Homes in Arizona, has a background in aeronautical composites that he has used to help develop and implement a form of hemp concrete that is so strong it doesn’t require rebar.

“The strength and insulation properties of this material make it a game-changer. It can be molded with conduits run through each panel for wiring and plumbing. There’s no need for rebar, so it requires less labor. It has seismic resistance, and the R-value is very high. With a 12-inch wall, the energy savings pay for the cost of construction,” Hodge said.

Carrie Lewis gives natural homebuilding workshops through her business, Cob Designs in Bellingham. She showed a sample of hemp lime plaster that absorbs water and hardens when wet.

“It’s highly mold resistant, so it would be great for exterior applications here in the Northwest,” Lewis said. “I’m just being exposed to hemp fiber and I’m hopeful for greater access. It would be great if it were produced locally.”

Tim Pate, who sits on the advisory committee for industrial hemp administrative rules for the state of Oregon, passed around a piece of medium density hemp fiberboard developed during his time with C S Specialty Building Supply in the ’90s.

“That board met or surpassed every standard in the industry,” Pate said. “It’s lighter and stronger than wood. Washington has no shortage of intelligent, capable people in the timber industry, and it wouldn’t take much to convert some of those same factories to produce hemp fiberboard.” 

The one major obstacle to hemp production is that it is illegal to grow in the United States. Hemp is closely related to marijuana, which is classified as a Schedule I controlled substance by the Drug Enforcement Agency. Although hemp is not a drug, it can cross-pollinate with its more potent cousin, a concern that will have to be addressed before the industry takes off. 

Despite this obstacle, recent measures at the state and national level are beginning to open the doors for industrial hemp production. The federal 2014 Farm Bill included a provision that would allow institutions of higher education and state departments of agriculture to grow or cultivate industrial hemp to study it for possible future use as a commercial product. 

Washington House Bill 1888 would permit the development of an industrial hemp industry in Washington. The house of representatives unanimously passed the bill on the last night of the regular session, and had gone to roll call in the senate when the senators tabled it to vote on a drone bill.

“The amended bill will be brought back in the January 2015 session,” Soderberg said. “We’re assembling a volunteer commission board to draft the rules and regulations for growers so that when the law is passed, the department of agriculture will be able to distribute licenses as soon as possible.”

Politicians in attendance at the meeting included State Senator Doug Erickson, Rep. Vincent Buys, Whatcom County councilmember Barbara Brenner, Burr, and house-hopefuls Joy Monjure and Luanne VanWerven.

Soderberg said a handful of farmers in Whatcom County have a total of over 1,000 acres ready to dedicate to hemp production. 

“There are so many things we can do with industrial hemp once our farmers are allowed to put these seeds in the ground,” Soderberg said.

Source

The Dose Makes The Poison: Synthetic Cannabinoid Illnesses in NY

The incessant ramblings of a forensic toxicologist and drug chemist

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? |

art12art12

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuanamarijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

by Jeff Roberts

Featured On Collective Evolution

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Another Study Finds No Evidence That Medical Marijuana Increases

A Greener TodayA Greener TodayA
few weeks ago, in a column about the impact of marijuana
legalization, I
noted
that there is not much evidence to support the frequently
voiced
fear
that allowing medical use encourages teenagers to smoke
pot. A new study by three economists reinforces that
point, finding that the adoption of medical marijuana laws is not
associated with increases in cannabis consumption by high school
students. “Our results are not consistent with the hypothesis
that legalization leads to increased use of marijuana by
teenagers,” write D. Mark Anderson of Montana State University,
Benjamin Hansen of the University of Oregon, and Daniel Rees of the
University Colorado in a working paper
published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Anderson et al. used data from three sources:
the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, the National
Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and the Treatment Episode Data Set.
These analyses provide further evidence that
youth marijuana consumption does not increase with
the legalization of medical marijuana,” they write.
Our results are not consistent with the hypothesis
that the legalization of medical marijuana caused an increase
in the use of marijuana among high school students. In
fact, estimates from our preferred specification are small,
consistently negative, and are never statistically
distinguishable from zero.”

The impact of general legalization, of course, might be
different. Assuming that legal marijuana businesses in places such
as Colorado and Washington eventually displace the black market,
teenagers will find it harder to buy pot directly, since licensed
sellers, unlike your average street dealer,
check IDs
to make sure buyers are at least 21. But it may
become easier for teenagers to obtain pot indirectly, via legal
buyers. Still, Anderson et al.’s findings are significant, because
in some states (including Colorado, Washington, and California) the
rules for obtaining medical marijuana are loose enough that it’s
easy for recreational consumers to pose as patients. In fact,
critics commonly complain that medical marijuana in those states is
legalization by another name. Rees nevertheless
told
 The Washington Post that the overall
results of this study hold true for individual states as
well. 
“No single state stood out,” he said. “The
effect of passing a medical marijuana law on youth consumption
appears to be zero across the board.”

N.Y. Times endorses marijuana legalization

The New York Times editorial board endorsed the repeal of federal law banning marijuana use on Saturday, a landmark moment in the decades-long fight for legalization.

The Times is also rolling out an interactive six-part series with more editorials discussing issues related to marijuana use. In the first interactive editorial, which turns the stars of the American flag into marijuana leaves as the user scrolls down, the editorial board argued that the ban on marijuana has caused “great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.”

“There are no perfect answers to people’s legitimate concerns about marijuana use. But neither are there such answers about tobacco or alcohol, and we believe that on every level — health effects, the impact on society and law-and-order issues — the balance falls squarely on the side of national legalization,” the board wrote. “That will put decisions on whether to allow recreational or medicinal production and use where it belongs — at the state level.”

The Times is the biggest U.S. newspaper to endorse the legalization of marijuana. In recent years magazines like National Review and a few state newspapers like the Las Vegas Review Journal and the Star-Ledger Editorial Board have endorsed legalization.

The Times editorial board compared the 40-year federal ban on marijuana to the 13 years  known as ‘prohibition’ when the government banned alcohol, “in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished.”

The series, available at a section of the Times website dubbed “High Time,” will look at topics around the legalizing marijuana, such as federalism and the states and questions of health and safety. It will continue over the next several weeks.

Editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal said in a statement they wanted to deepen the engagement with readers with this series.

“These signed editorials explore a variety of issues critical to the national conversation about marijuana. We will continue to experiment in the future on different ways to use the power of the unsigned editorial, along with new and different ways to signal the author of other editorial articles,” Rosenthal said.

Discovery's Industrial Hemp Crop Photo Update | Weed Blog

 

The Dose Makes The Poison: Synthetic Cannabinoid Illnesses in NY

The incessant ramblings of a forensic toxicologist and drug chemist

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? |

art12art12

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuanamarijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

by Jeff Roberts

Featured On Collective Evolution

Featured Image

Comments:

Medical Marijuana to Become Prosecution Proof? | High Times

The medical marijuana community could soon be untouchable by federal prosecutors. This is the goal of an amendment filed this week by Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, which would serve as a safeguard for those states with medical marijuana legislation by offering dispensaries, doctors and patients protection from the snarling dogs of the drug war.

On Thursday, Paul filed his Amendment 3630, as part of the Bring Jobs Home Act, which would allow medical marijuana commerce to legally function in accordance with state laws without running the risk of federal heat.

“A State may enact and implement a law that authorizes the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of marijuana for medical use,” reads the proposal. “No prosecution may be commenced or maintained against any physician or patient for a violation of any Federal law.”

The amendment, according to Paul’s communications director, Brian Darling, is an effort to make the 33 states and the District of Columbia that have legalized medical marijuana, in some form, prosecution proof from the wrath of federal pot laws. 

“What we’re trying to do is look at the law and allow states that have changed their laws and have allowed medical marijuana to do so, for doctors to be able to prescribe and for people to be able to get those prescriptions without being worried about the federal government coming in and arresting them,” Darling told The Huffington Post.

Earlier this year, the House of Representatives approved similar legislation, known as the Rohrbacher-Farr amendment, aimed at preventing the Drug Enforcement Administration from using federal funds to raid legal medical marijuana businesses. However, Darling says Amendment 3630 offers a more solid foundation than previous legislation for shielding medical marijuana states.

“The effort before was to defund prosecutions — so it would block the federal government from prosecuting until that appropriations bill runs out about a year later,” said Darling. Paul’s latest proposal “would protect the states’ rights to make those decisions about medical marijuana that wouldn’t expire when the appropriations bill comes back up,” said Darling.

Unfortunately, due to the recent immobilization of the Senate, it is highly unlikely this amendment will even get a vote. 

Mike Adams writes for stoners and smut enthusiasts in High Times, Playboy’s The Smoking Jacket and Hustler Magazine. You can follow him on Twitter @adamssoup and on Facebook/mikeadams73.

N.Y. Times endorses marijuana legalization

The New York Times editorial board endorsed the repeal of federal law banning marijuana use on Saturday, a landmark moment in the decades-long fight for legalization.

The Times is also rolling out an interactive six-part series with more editorials discussing issues related to marijuana use. In the first interactive editorial, which turns the stars of the American flag into marijuana leaves as the user scrolls down, the editorial board argued that the ban on marijuana has caused “great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.”

“There are no perfect answers to people’s legitimate concerns about marijuana use. But neither are there such answers about tobacco or alcohol, and we believe that on every level — health effects, the impact on society and law-and-order issues — the balance falls squarely on the side of national legalization,” the board wrote. “That will put decisions on whether to allow recreational or medicinal production and use where it belongs — at the state level.”

The Times is the biggest U.S. newspaper to endorse the legalization of marijuana. In recent years magazines like National Review and a few state newspapers like the Las Vegas Review Journal and the Star-Ledger Editorial Board have endorsed legalization.

The Times editorial board compared the 40-year federal ban on marijuana to the 13 years  known as ‘prohibition’ when the government banned alcohol, “in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished.”

The series, available at a section of the Times website dubbed “High Time,” will look at topics around the legalizing marijuana, such as federalism and the states and questions of health and safety. It will continue over the next several weeks.

Editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal said in a statement they wanted to deepen the engagement with readers with this series.

“These signed editorials explore a variety of issues critical to the national conversation about marijuana. We will continue to experiment in the future on different ways to use the power of the unsigned editorial, along with new and different ways to signal the author of other editorial articles,” Rosenthal said.