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Alaska Becomes Third State to Legalize Marijuana | TheBlaze.com

Story by the Associated Press; curated by Oliver Darcy.

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska on Tuesday became the third U.S. state to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, but organizers don’t expect any public celebrations since it remains illegal to smoke marijuana in public.

In the state’s largest city, Anchorage police officers are ready to start handing out $100 fines to make sure taking a toke remains something to be done behind closed doors.

Placing Alaska in the same category as Washington state and Colorado with legal marijuana was the goal of a coalition including libertarians, rugged individualists and small-government Republicans who prize the privacy rights enshrined in the Alaska state constitution.

In this Feb. 20, 2015 photo, Alaska Cannabis Club CEO Charlo Greene smokes a joint at the medical marijuana dispensary in Anchorage, Alaska. On Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, Alaska will become the third state in the nation to legalize marijuana. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

In this Feb. 20, 2015 photo, Alaska Cannabis Club CEO Charlo Greene smokes a joint at the medical marijuana dispensary in Anchorage, Alaska. On Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, Alaska will become the third state in the nation to legalize marijuana. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

When they voted 53-47 percent last November to legalize marijuana use by adults in private places, they left many of the details to lawmakers and regulators to sort out.

That has left confusion on many matters.

The initiative bans smoking in public, but didn’t define what that means, and lawmakers left the question to the alcohol regulatory board, which planned to meet early Tuesday to discuss an emergency response.

That’s left different communities across the state to adopt different standards of what smoking in public means to them. In Anchorage, officials tried and failed in December to ban a new commercial marijuana industry. But Police Chief Mark Mew said his officers will be strictly enforcing the public smoking ban. He even warned people against smoking on their porches if they live next to a park.

But far to the north, in North Pole, smoking outdoors on private property will be OK as long as it doesn’t create a nuisance, officials there said.

Other officials are still discussing a proposed cultivation ban for the Kenai Peninsula.

In some respects, the confusion continues a four-decade reality for Alaskans and their relationship with marijuana.

While the 1975 Alaska Supreme Court decision protected personal marijuana possession and a 1998 initiative legalized medicinal marijuana, state lawmakers twice criminalized any possession over the years, creating an odd legal limbo.

As of Tuesday, adult Alaskans can not only keep and use pot, they can transport, grow it and give it away. A second phase, creating a regulated and taxed marijuana market, won’t start until 2016 at the earliest. That’s about the same timeline for Oregon, where voters approved legalizing marijuana the same day as Alaska did but the law there doesn’t go into effect until July 1. Washington state and Colorado voters legalized marijuana in 2012 and sales have started there.

And while possession is no longer a crime under state law, enjoying pot in public can bring a $100 fine.

That’s fine with Dean Smith, a pot-smoker in Juneau who has friends in jail for marijuana offenses. “It’s going to stop a lot of people getting arrested for nonviolent crimes,” he said.

The initiative’s backers warned pot enthusiasts to keep their cool.

“Don’t do anything to give your neighbors reason to feel uneasy about this new law. We’re in the midst of an enormous social and legal shift,” organizers wrote in the Alaska Dispatch News, the state’s largest newspaper.

Richard Ziegler, who had been promoting what he called “Idida-toke” in a nod to Alaska’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, reluctantly called off his party.

There’s no such pullback for former television reporter Charlo Greene, now CEO of the Alaska Cannabis Club, which is having its grand opening on Tuesday in downtown Anchorage. She’s already pushing the limits, promising to give away weed to paying “medical marijuana” patients and other “club members.”

In this Feb. 3, 2005 photo provided by the Alaska State Troopers, AST, marijuana plants are seen after a raid in a town in Alaska. Lawmakers will hear from law enforcement and marijuana supporters regarding regulations for the drug Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Alaska State Troopers, File)

In this Feb. 3, 2005 photo provided by the Alaska State Troopers, AST, marijuana plants are seen after a raid in a town in Alaska. Lawmakers will hear from law enforcement and marijuana supporters regarding regulations for the drug Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Alaska State Troopers, File)

Greene — who quit her job with a four-letter walkoff on live television last year to devote her efforts to passing the initiative — plans a celebratory toke at 4:20 p.m.

Meanwhile, Alaska Native leaders worry that legalization will bring new temptations to communities already confronting high rates of drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence and suicide.

“When they start depending on smoking marijuana, I don’t know how far they’d go to get the funds they need to support it, to support themselves,” said Edward Nick, council member in Manokotak, a remote village of 400 that is predominantly Yup’ik Eskimo.

Both alcohol and drug use are prohibited in Nick’s village 350 miles southwest of Anchorage, even inside the privacy of villagers’ homes.

But Nick fears that the initiative, in combination with a 1975 state Supreme Court decision that legalized marijuana use inside homes — could open doors to drug abuse.

Initiative backers promised Native leaders that communities could still have local control under certain conditions. Alaska law gives every community the option to regulate alcohol locally. From northern Barrow to Klawock, 1,291 miles away in southeast Alaska, 108 communities impose local limits on alcohol, and 33 of them ban it altogether.

But the initiative did not provide clear opt-out language for tribal councils and other smaller communities, forcing each one to figure out how to proceed Tuesday.

Industrial hemp gets state Senate approval

OLYMPIA — Industrial hemp would be allowed to be grown in Washington state under a measure passed by the Senate.

Senate Bill 5012 received unanimous support Wednesday in the Senate and now heads to the House for consideration. The measure authorizes the growing of industrial hemp as an agricultural activity in the state. It also directs Washington State University to study industrial hemp production in the state, with a report due to the Legislature by Jan. 14, 2016.

Hemp, like marijuana, comes from the cannabis plant but has much less THC, the active ingredient in marijuana that makes people high.

Washington voters passed Initiative 502 in November 2012 to legalize and regulate the recreational use of pot by adults over 21, and the first state-licensed pot stores opened last summer.

Cannabinoid Treatments vs Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

In the United States alone, breast cancer affects hundreds of thousands of women and many men every year. Some non-invasive forms of the disease are relatively treatable, but many types are far more aggressive.

What is Triple-Negative Breast Cancer?

tripleTriple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is particularly challenging. Most breast cancers are largely drivenby hormone epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), estrogen receptors, and/or progesterone receptors. Since TNBC cells do not express these receptors, there are less ways to fight them. Thankfully, at least some cell lines express cannabinoid receptors, making cannabinoids one of the only potential targeted treatments for TNBC.

A January 2015 study in Molecular Oncology extensively detailed the numerous ways CBD fights triple-negative breast cancer. By inhibiting epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its related receptor, CBD reduced the proliferation, migration, and invasion of TNBC cells. It also lowered the amount of inflammatory cytokines released by cancer cells, along with two matrix metalloproteinase enzymes associated with metastasis. Through these effects, CBD inhibited breast cancer growth and metastasis in two mouse models.

“For years, studies have suggested cannabinoids [found in cannabis] fight different forms of breast cancer.”

Ultimately, as the title of the article stated, CBD modulates the tumor microenvironment to inhibit cancer through multiple mechanisms. It is important to note that EGF is slightly different than HER-2, and while the latter is always absent in triple-negative breast cancer, the former is often present.

Another February 2015 study in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry found that a synthetic cannabinoid induced programmed cell death in TNBC cell lines via CB2 receptor activation. When the compound was tested on normal tissue, no toxic effects were observed. Since THC activates CB2 receptors, and CBD has some weak affinity for it, those phytocannabinoids could also theoretically kill TNBC.

Studies Prove Viability of Cannabinoid Treatments

For years, studies have suggested cannabinoids fight different forms of breast cancer. THC has been shown to induce apoptosis in ErbB2-positive breast cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth in animals. CBD is known to work at the genetic level, blocking expression of the ID-1 gene to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

stefanie larueGiven these studies, it is no surprise that many humans have had direct success against their cancers with cannabis extracts. Stefanie LaRue beat Stage IV breast cancer during its third recurrence using cannabis oil. While chemotherapy and other techniques had stopped the disease twice before, they were apparently not enough to completely eliminate the cancer.

“Cannabis oil killed all of the tumors in my body. My monthly lab and quarterly scan results are proof that the cannabis oil treatment worked,” Stefanie said. Other similar stories can be found online, although none seem to directly relate to TNBC. However, since extracts have reportedly been effective against numerous cases of Stage IV terminal breast cancer, it is likely some of them were TNBC. In any case, more research is desperately needed to determine the effectiveness of cannabis extracts against this aggressive breast cancer.

Responsible, Spiritual Cannabis Use | Wes Annac's Personal Blog

Credit: Realfarmacy.com

Written by Wes Annac, The Culture of Awareness

I’ve said before that I think cannabis is a helpful spiritual assistant that, if used properly, can enable us to explore our consciousness and raise our vibration.

The well-meaning cannabis culture unfortunately fails to recognize the spiritual uses of the herb and encourages endless use that can lead to dependence if the user isn’t careful, and this could change if its spiritual uses were recognized or accepted.

I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with the cannabis culture, but some people don’t realize that the herb can do far more than intoxicate you or put you on a euphoric cloud. It’s much more potent when it’s used for meditative purposes, and there are ways we can enhance its meditative value.

There are things we can do to get the most out of it, and in my opinion, one of the best ways to really benefit from it is to set limits and use it responsibly.

The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (commonly known as NORML) has provided guidelines for responsible cannabis use, and whether we use it recreationally, medicinally or meditatively, setting some limits is always healthy.

In my opinion, the reason it’s illegal in the first place (beyond the fact that interests behind the scenes seem to make more money that way) is because the planetary controllers don’t want people to use it to expand their minds.

In some cases, cannabis leads people to question their reality and the motives of the people in power.

Discoveries are made about the things the controllers are doing to keep us oppressed and the things we can do to break their programming and start embodying (and expressing) higher aspects of our consciousness, and the interests who profit from humanity’s unawareness don’t want cannabis to awaken people.

Credit: Pinterest.com

They don’t want people to realize what this herb and its cousin, hemp, can do for our society and our spirituality, and this is why so much effort has been made since the thirties to keep it illegal. Luckily, the world is waking up and cannabis is becoming legal in more and more places.

People have been saying since the seventies that it’d be legalized any time now, and now that it’s legalization is finally picking up speed, its users might want to keep a few things in mind when it becomes legal everywhere.

One is that, in the beginning at least, the system will probably still find ways to oppress users. DUI checkpoints could become more common as the controllers try to arrest people for driving under the influence of marijuana, which isn’t recommended but still isn’t nearly as harmful as driving drunk.

Other legal measures will probably be taken to make things harder for users, and drug tests could potentially increase. Big industries, like tobacco and alcohol, will try to dominate the cannabis market, because it’ll have been regulated and opened to the capitalist vultures who see dollar signs everywhere they look.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it isn’t really a good thing either. I don’t think the system (or the big industries it protects) should have any control over cannabis, but there are a few necessary evils we’ll have to accept if we want to diminish the legal consequences of its use, which should’ve never existed in the first place.

Those consequences only exist to benefit the people in power, but luckily, they’re falling away as more states (and countries, like Uruguay and Jamaica) legalize.

When it comes to spiritual use, we might want to practice a few things that’ll help us get the most out of the herb. I’d recommend exercising before using it and doing breath work during, because exercise gets the blood pumping and the spirit flowing and breath work can increase that flow even more.

Some spiritual and recreational users listen to (or play) music while they consume it, and while this is a great way to enjoy the herb, we might want to sit in contemplative silence while using it every now and then. Cannabis enhances music or anything else we do while we enjoy it, but it can seriously amaze us if it’s used for purely meditative purposes.

Origin of photo unknown

It was used in a lot of ancient cultures to expand the users’ minds, and I’m sure they enjoyed music or other spiritually rooted activities while they used it too. We can use it to enhance music every now and then, but I’d recommend using it primarily for spiritual exploration.

Music is great, but like Rumi and a few other spiritual teachers have told us, the best way to access the music within is to sit in silence and explore our consciousness. This is exactly what cannabis can help us do, but we can only benefit from it in the meditative sense if we’re willing to use it to enhance our meditations.

I look forward to the time when cannabis users don’t have to be ostracized or made to feel like outcasts.

The time is soon coming when passionate users won’t have to hide from the world or feel shameful about this lovely little herb that can expand our minds. Hopefully, the taboo that surrounds it will fade as it becomes legal everywhere and more people open up to the idea that it isn’t the devilish weed it’s been made out to be.

I’m sure mainstream society will still hesitate to fully accept it for a while, but with the legalization movement finally making notable progress after decades spent fighting for the freedom to use it without being treated like a criminal, society’s getting closer to accepting it.

Whether or not our culture accepts that it can be used recreationally or spiritually without the exaggerated side effects we’ve been programmed to fear, the people who are passionate about it will continue to explore their passion and strive to awaken others.

The world will awaken when it’s ready, and for now, those of us who know it isn’t evil (and, in fact, it can help our society in ways that are just becoming apparent) can continue to expand our minds and spread the truth about this demonized herb. One thing’s for sure: It’s ready to have its day in the sun.

Credit: Drugpossessionlaws.com

It’ll eventually be accepted, even if it takes a while, and if we remember to set limits and use it responsibly (whether we use it recreationally or meditatively), we can show the world that sustained yet balanced use is possible.

No matter how you use it, rest assured that in time, you’ll no longer be oppressed by the authorities or the close-minded people who refuse to step outside of the preconditioned perceptual boxes that have been created for them by the powers that be.

The world’s finally opening up to cannabis, and as it does, those of us who’ve long supported it are learning that there are wholesome and destructive ways to use it.

If you use it wholesomely, you could awaken to things that’ll completely change your worldview. If you use it destructively, it could cause you to close your mind and depend solely on it for any love, spirituality or wholeness. There’s always a healthy middle ground, and even the most passionate user is encouraged to be responsible and respectful.

Share freely.

I’m a twenty-one year old writer, blogger, and channel for the creative expression of the Universe, and I created The Culture of Awareness daily news site.

The Culture of Awareness features daily spiritual and alternative news, articles I’ve written, and more. Its purpose is to awaken and uplift by providing material about the fall of the planetary elite and a new paradigm of unity and spirituality.

I’ve contributed to a few different spiritual websites including The Master Shift, Waking Times, Golden Age of Gaia, Wake Up World and Expanded Consciousness. I can also be found on Facebook (Wes Annac and The Culture of Awareness) and Twitter, and I write a paid weekly newsletter that you can subscribe to for $11.11 a month here.

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This bill could legalize medical marijuana in Utah; Here's what it

SALT LAKE CITY — A bill that could legalize medical cannabis in Utah has been introduced in the state legislature.

Senate Bill 259, sponsored by Sen. Mark Madsen, R-Saratoga Springs, would allow for people with debilitating illnesses (such as AIDS, cancer and other qualifying conditions) to possess and use cannabis — in gummy or liquid form.

Asked by FOX 13 if he has ever tried marijuana, Sen. Madsen revealed that he did.

“I drove to Colorado, weekend before last and tried that under the direction of my doctor,” he replied.

The senator said he has been treated for back problems requiring him to see specialists across the United States. The doctors suggested medical cannabis as opposed to prescription opioids.

“I think it’s effective,” Sen. Madsen said Wednesday. “It has effective analgesic properties. I observed a dimmunition in my level of pain.”

Under SB259, dispensaries would be licensed by the state to distribute cannabis products. Sen. Madsen insisted that recreational marijuana would remain illegal in Utah, as would smoking it (even if it were medicinal).

Sen. Madsen spent Wednesday meeting with people to discuss his bill. Even Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, had questions for him.

“Is it more or less addictive than opioids?” Sen. Niederhauser asked him.

Madsen replied that he believed it was less addictive.

Sen. Madsen said it was learning more about the benefits of medical cannabis that encouraged him to run this bill. He was also touched by the stories of epileptic children whose parents lobbied the legislature for cannabis oil treatments last year.

Lawmakers expressed skepticism about the bill’s chances.

“I think it creates an atmosphere of more caution, but that’s something the bill is going to have to deal with,” Niederhauser said.

House Speaker Greg Hughes, R-Draper, told reporters: “I’m not nuts about it.”

“What I worry is that we’re really not talking about medical care, we’re just trying to potentially legalize marijuana,” Hughes said. “For me? I’m not interested in going that direction.”

Governor Gary Herbert also expressed opposition to the bill.

“I’m a little concerned about what I’ve observed in other states, where they’ve said you can grow for medical purposes and you own kind of your own self-diagnosis,” he said in a news conference Tuesday. “Or you can get some doctor who is less strict about his own diagnosis and the next thing you know, we’ve got recreational marijuana.”

Sen. Madsen said his fellow lawmakers need to be educated about medical cannabis.

“I think we need to push past the emotion and propaganda that’s been promulgated over the years to get to the facts. Once people look at it with an eye toward facts and freedom, we might change some opinions,” he said. “‘Reefer Madness’ is neither medical research nor public policy. It’s a propaganda movie and we can’t be basing our policy on that anymore, I believe.”

Sen. Madsen has fast-tracked the bill. It was unveiled Wednesday and has its first hearing on Thursday morning before the Senate Judiciary Committee. It’s the committee he chairs.

 

Alaska Becomes Third State to Legalize Marijuana | TheBlaze.com

Story by the Associated Press; curated by Oliver Darcy.

JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska on Tuesday became the third U.S. state to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, but organizers don’t expect any public celebrations since it remains illegal to smoke marijuana in public.

In the state’s largest city, Anchorage police officers are ready to start handing out $100 fines to make sure taking a toke remains something to be done behind closed doors.

Placing Alaska in the same category as Washington state and Colorado with legal marijuana was the goal of a coalition including libertarians, rugged individualists and small-government Republicans who prize the privacy rights enshrined in the Alaska state constitution.

In this Feb. 20, 2015 photo, Alaska Cannabis Club CEO Charlo Greene smokes a joint at the medical marijuana dispensary in Anchorage, Alaska. On Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, Alaska will become the third state in the nation to legalize marijuana. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

In this Feb. 20, 2015 photo, Alaska Cannabis Club CEO Charlo Greene smokes a joint at the medical marijuana dispensary in Anchorage, Alaska. On Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015, Alaska will become the third state in the nation to legalize marijuana. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

When they voted 53-47 percent last November to legalize marijuana use by adults in private places, they left many of the details to lawmakers and regulators to sort out.

That has left confusion on many matters.

The initiative bans smoking in public, but didn’t define what that means, and lawmakers left the question to the alcohol regulatory board, which planned to meet early Tuesday to discuss an emergency response.

That’s left different communities across the state to adopt different standards of what smoking in public means to them. In Anchorage, officials tried and failed in December to ban a new commercial marijuana industry. But Police Chief Mark Mew said his officers will be strictly enforcing the public smoking ban. He even warned people against smoking on their porches if they live next to a park.

But far to the north, in North Pole, smoking outdoors on private property will be OK as long as it doesn’t create a nuisance, officials there said.

Other officials are still discussing a proposed cultivation ban for the Kenai Peninsula.

In some respects, the confusion continues a four-decade reality for Alaskans and their relationship with marijuana.

While the 1975 Alaska Supreme Court decision protected personal marijuana possession and a 1998 initiative legalized medicinal marijuana, state lawmakers twice criminalized any possession over the years, creating an odd legal limbo.

As of Tuesday, adult Alaskans can not only keep and use pot, they can transport, grow it and give it away. A second phase, creating a regulated and taxed marijuana market, won’t start until 2016 at the earliest. That’s about the same timeline for Oregon, where voters approved legalizing marijuana the same day as Alaska did but the law there doesn’t go into effect until July 1. Washington state and Colorado voters legalized marijuana in 2012 and sales have started there.

And while possession is no longer a crime under state law, enjoying pot in public can bring a $100 fine.

That’s fine with Dean Smith, a pot-smoker in Juneau who has friends in jail for marijuana offenses. “It’s going to stop a lot of people getting arrested for nonviolent crimes,” he said.

The initiative’s backers warned pot enthusiasts to keep their cool.

“Don’t do anything to give your neighbors reason to feel uneasy about this new law. We’re in the midst of an enormous social and legal shift,” organizers wrote in the Alaska Dispatch News, the state’s largest newspaper.

Richard Ziegler, who had been promoting what he called “Idida-toke” in a nod to Alaska’s Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, reluctantly called off his party.

There’s no such pullback for former television reporter Charlo Greene, now CEO of the Alaska Cannabis Club, which is having its grand opening on Tuesday in downtown Anchorage. She’s already pushing the limits, promising to give away weed to paying “medical marijuana” patients and other “club members.”

In this Feb. 3, 2005 photo provided by the Alaska State Troopers, AST, marijuana plants are seen after a raid in a town in Alaska. Lawmakers will hear from law enforcement and marijuana supporters regarding regulations for the drug Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Alaska State Troopers, File)

In this Feb. 3, 2005 photo provided by the Alaska State Troopers, AST, marijuana plants are seen after a raid in a town in Alaska. Lawmakers will hear from law enforcement and marijuana supporters regarding regulations for the drug Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Alaska State Troopers, File)

Greene — who quit her job with a four-letter walkoff on live television last year to devote her efforts to passing the initiative — plans a celebratory toke at 4:20 p.m.

Meanwhile, Alaska Native leaders worry that legalization will bring new temptations to communities already confronting high rates of drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence and suicide.

“When they start depending on smoking marijuana, I don’t know how far they’d go to get the funds they need to support it, to support themselves,” said Edward Nick, council member in Manokotak, a remote village of 400 that is predominantly Yup’ik Eskimo.

Both alcohol and drug use are prohibited in Nick’s village 350 miles southwest of Anchorage, even inside the privacy of villagers’ homes.

But Nick fears that the initiative, in combination with a 1975 state Supreme Court decision that legalized marijuana use inside homes — could open doors to drug abuse.

Initiative backers promised Native leaders that communities could still have local control under certain conditions. Alaska law gives every community the option to regulate alcohol locally. From northern Barrow to Klawock, 1,291 miles away in southeast Alaska, 108 communities impose local limits on alcohol, and 33 of them ban it altogether.

But the initiative did not provide clear opt-out language for tribal councils and other smaller communities, forcing each one to figure out how to proceed Tuesday.

Industrial Hemp Bill Formally Introduced by Sens. Schwank, Folmer

READING, Feb. 12, 2015 – Pennsylvania farmers would be able to grow a new cash crop and participate in a wide range of manufacturing opportunities if a bill that Sens. Judy Schwank (D-Berks) and Mike Folmer (R-Lebanon) formally introduced today.

Senate Bill 50 would re-establish the industrial hemp industry in Pennsylvania.

“From paper to fuel, clothing to biodegradable plastics, the return of industrial hemp would give Pennsylvania’s farmers the opportunity to grow an in-demand crop that benefits tens of millions of people all over the world,” Schwank, the Democratic chair of the Senate Agriculture Rural Affairs Committee, said.

“Sen. Folmer and I are planning to fervently work to return industrial hemp to Pennsylvania’s menu of growing options,” she said.

The federal 1937 Marijuana Tax Act restricted industrial hemp production. In 1970, the Controlled Substances Act declared hemp to be illegal.

The 2014 Farm Bill loosened restrictions on the production of industrial hemp.

“Industrial hemp does not have a psychoactive effect; the THC level is less than 0.03 percent,” Sen. Folmer said. “Misconceptions are withholding Pennsylvania from an opportunity for our agricultural and business industries to thrive.

“Twelve other states are already ahead of Pennsylvania in this industry. We are long overdue on utilizing the prospects that the Farm Bill of 2014 has offered to us as a state.”

Folmer is planning to hold a town hall meeting March 11 in Annville to discuss this industrial hemp proposal as well as legislation (Senate Bill 3) that would allow the use of medical cannabis.

Under Senate Bill 50, the cultivation and processing of industrial hemp would be allowed in Pennsylvania as part of a research program at a college or university – in accordance with federal law – under the regulation of a five-member Industrial Hemp Licensing Board that would be established within the Department of Agriculture.

Industrial hemp would also be recognized in Pennsylvania as an oilseed.

Should the U.S. government act to once again regulate industrial hemp, Pennsylvania’s Industrial Hemp Act would 60 days after the enactment of that federal statute.

###

More information on Sen. Schwank is available on her website, Facebook and Twitter.

Cannabinoid Treatments vs Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

In the United States alone, breast cancer affects hundreds of thousands of women and many men every year. Some non-invasive forms of the disease are relatively treatable, but many types are far more aggressive.

What is Triple-Negative Breast Cancer?

tripleTriple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is particularly challenging. Most breast cancers are largely drivenby hormone epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), estrogen receptors, and/or progesterone receptors. Since TNBC cells do not express these receptors, there are less ways to fight them. Thankfully, at least some cell lines express cannabinoid receptors, making cannabinoids one of the only potential targeted treatments for TNBC.

A January 2015 study in Molecular Oncology extensively detailed the numerous ways CBD fights triple-negative breast cancer. By inhibiting epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its related receptor, CBD reduced the proliferation, migration, and invasion of TNBC cells. It also lowered the amount of inflammatory cytokines released by cancer cells, along with two matrix metalloproteinase enzymes associated with metastasis. Through these effects, CBD inhibited breast cancer growth and metastasis in two mouse models.

“For years, studies have suggested cannabinoids [found in cannabis] fight different forms of breast cancer.”

Ultimately, as the title of the article stated, CBD modulates the tumor microenvironment to inhibit cancer through multiple mechanisms. It is important to note that EGF is slightly different than HER-2, and while the latter is always absent in triple-negative breast cancer, the former is often present.

Another February 2015 study in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry found that a synthetic cannabinoid induced programmed cell death in TNBC cell lines via CB2 receptor activation. When the compound was tested on normal tissue, no toxic effects were observed. Since THC activates CB2 receptors, and CBD has some weak affinity for it, those phytocannabinoids could also theoretically kill TNBC.

Studies Prove Viability of Cannabinoid Treatments

For years, studies have suggested cannabinoids fight different forms of breast cancer. THC has been shown to induce apoptosis in ErbB2-positive breast cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth in animals. CBD is known to work at the genetic level, blocking expression of the ID-1 gene to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

stefanie larueGiven these studies, it is no surprise that many humans have had direct success against their cancers with cannabis extracts. Stefanie LaRue beat Stage IV breast cancer during its third recurrence using cannabis oil. While chemotherapy and other techniques had stopped the disease twice before, they were apparently not enough to completely eliminate the cancer.

“Cannabis oil killed all of the tumors in my body. My monthly lab and quarterly scan results are proof that the cannabis oil treatment worked,” Stefanie said. Other similar stories can be found online, although none seem to directly relate to TNBC. However, since extracts have reportedly been effective against numerous cases of Stage IV terminal breast cancer, it is likely some of them were TNBC. In any case, more research is desperately needed to determine the effectiveness of cannabis extracts against this aggressive breast cancer.

Responsible, Spiritual Cannabis Use | Wes Annac's Personal Blog

Credit: Realfarmacy.com

Written by Wes Annac, The Culture of Awareness

I’ve said before that I think cannabis is a helpful spiritual assistant that, if used properly, can enable us to explore our consciousness and raise our vibration.

The well-meaning cannabis culture unfortunately fails to recognize the spiritual uses of the herb and encourages endless use that can lead to dependence if the user isn’t careful, and this could change if its spiritual uses were recognized or accepted.

I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with the cannabis culture, but some people don’t realize that the herb can do far more than intoxicate you or put you on a euphoric cloud. It’s much more potent when it’s used for meditative purposes, and there are ways we can enhance its meditative value.

There are things we can do to get the most out of it, and in my opinion, one of the best ways to really benefit from it is to set limits and use it responsibly.

The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (commonly known as NORML) has provided guidelines for responsible cannabis use, and whether we use it recreationally, medicinally or meditatively, setting some limits is always healthy.

In my opinion, the reason it’s illegal in the first place (beyond the fact that interests behind the scenes seem to make more money that way) is because the planetary controllers don’t want people to use it to expand their minds.

In some cases, cannabis leads people to question their reality and the motives of the people in power.

Discoveries are made about the things the controllers are doing to keep us oppressed and the things we can do to break their programming and start embodying (and expressing) higher aspects of our consciousness, and the interests who profit from humanity’s unawareness don’t want cannabis to awaken people.

Credit: Pinterest.com

They don’t want people to realize what this herb and its cousin, hemp, can do for our society and our spirituality, and this is why so much effort has been made since the thirties to keep it illegal. Luckily, the world is waking up and cannabis is becoming legal in more and more places.

People have been saying since the seventies that it’d be legalized any time now, and now that it’s legalization is finally picking up speed, its users might want to keep a few things in mind when it becomes legal everywhere.

One is that, in the beginning at least, the system will probably still find ways to oppress users. DUI checkpoints could become more common as the controllers try to arrest people for driving under the influence of marijuana, which isn’t recommended but still isn’t nearly as harmful as driving drunk.

Other legal measures will probably be taken to make things harder for users, and drug tests could potentially increase. Big industries, like tobacco and alcohol, will try to dominate the cannabis market, because it’ll have been regulated and opened to the capitalist vultures who see dollar signs everywhere they look.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it isn’t really a good thing either. I don’t think the system (or the big industries it protects) should have any control over cannabis, but there are a few necessary evils we’ll have to accept if we want to diminish the legal consequences of its use, which should’ve never existed in the first place.

Those consequences only exist to benefit the people in power, but luckily, they’re falling away as more states (and countries, like Uruguay and Jamaica) legalize.

When it comes to spiritual use, we might want to practice a few things that’ll help us get the most out of the herb. I’d recommend exercising before using it and doing breath work during, because exercise gets the blood pumping and the spirit flowing and breath work can increase that flow even more.

Some spiritual and recreational users listen to (or play) music while they consume it, and while this is a great way to enjoy the herb, we might want to sit in contemplative silence while using it every now and then. Cannabis enhances music or anything else we do while we enjoy it, but it can seriously amaze us if it’s used for purely meditative purposes.

Origin of photo unknown

It was used in a lot of ancient cultures to expand the users’ minds, and I’m sure they enjoyed music or other spiritually rooted activities while they used it too. We can use it to enhance music every now and then, but I’d recommend using it primarily for spiritual exploration.

Music is great, but like Rumi and a few other spiritual teachers have told us, the best way to access the music within is to sit in silence and explore our consciousness. This is exactly what cannabis can help us do, but we can only benefit from it in the meditative sense if we’re willing to use it to enhance our meditations.

I look forward to the time when cannabis users don’t have to be ostracized or made to feel like outcasts.

The time is soon coming when passionate users won’t have to hide from the world or feel shameful about this lovely little herb that can expand our minds. Hopefully, the taboo that surrounds it will fade as it becomes legal everywhere and more people open up to the idea that it isn’t the devilish weed it’s been made out to be.

I’m sure mainstream society will still hesitate to fully accept it for a while, but with the legalization movement finally making notable progress after decades spent fighting for the freedom to use it without being treated like a criminal, society’s getting closer to accepting it.

Whether or not our culture accepts that it can be used recreationally or spiritually without the exaggerated side effects we’ve been programmed to fear, the people who are passionate about it will continue to explore their passion and strive to awaken others.

The world will awaken when it’s ready, and for now, those of us who know it isn’t evil (and, in fact, it can help our society in ways that are just becoming apparent) can continue to expand our minds and spread the truth about this demonized herb. One thing’s for sure: It’s ready to have its day in the sun.

Credit: Drugpossessionlaws.com

It’ll eventually be accepted, even if it takes a while, and if we remember to set limits and use it responsibly (whether we use it recreationally or meditatively), we can show the world that sustained yet balanced use is possible.

No matter how you use it, rest assured that in time, you’ll no longer be oppressed by the authorities or the close-minded people who refuse to step outside of the preconditioned perceptual boxes that have been created for them by the powers that be.

The world’s finally opening up to cannabis, and as it does, those of us who’ve long supported it are learning that there are wholesome and destructive ways to use it.

If you use it wholesomely, you could awaken to things that’ll completely change your worldview. If you use it destructively, it could cause you to close your mind and depend solely on it for any love, spirituality or wholeness. There’s always a healthy middle ground, and even the most passionate user is encouraged to be responsible and respectful.

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I’m a twenty-one year old writer, blogger, and channel for the creative expression of the Universe, and I created The Culture of Awareness daily news site.

The Culture of Awareness features daily spiritual and alternative news, articles I’ve written, and more. Its purpose is to awaken and uplift by providing material about the fall of the planetary elite and a new paradigm of unity and spirituality.

I’ve contributed to a few different spiritual websites including The Master Shift, Waking Times, Golden Age of Gaia, Wake Up World and Expanded Consciousness. I can also be found on Facebook (Wes Annac and The Culture of Awareness) and Twitter, and I write a paid weekly newsletter that you can subscribe to for $11.11 a month here.

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Only On 2: Investigation Reveals Medical Marijuana Is Getting Into

CBS Los Angeles (con’t)

Affordable Care Act Updates:
CBSLA.com/ACA

Health News Information:
CBSLA.com/Health

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — In a CBS2 News exclusive, Investigative Reporter David Goldstein uncovers medical marijuana being sold to school-aged kids in broad daylight, within walking distance of local schools.

He reported the city was quick to act when he brought his disturbing findings to officials.

Goldstein recorded many instances of adults buying the marijuana and quickly turning around and re-selling it to the underage kids.

The students were shown, many times, smoking the pot minutes after leaving their schools.

The student’s faces were covered because most appeared to be under 18 — the legal age for receiving doctor’s approval to buy medical marijuana without a parents’ consent.

So exactly how did these kids get their hands on it?

Our hidden cameras caught the students paying someone else to get it for them — like this one man who didn’t want his face shown on TV.

On most afternoons, residents of the area say kids like these gather on Barton Avenue, near Western in Hollywood.

On a map, it’s easy to see the area is walking distance to several schools.

With their sneakers, skateboards and backpacks, it looks like any afterschool meeting place. Until you see what’s taking place on the corner — Natural Remedies Caregivers, a marijuana dispensary.

Goldstein reports, “we saw plenty of activity.”

In one instance, a group of young women is shown handing a man on a skateboard some money. He gets on the skateboard, then walks into the store. A few minutes later, he comes out carrying a white bag. He passes out what looks like pill jars to the girls on the street

The jars are similar to one Goldstein found in the bushes near the dispensary. They’re used as containers for the pot.

It says right on the label, “Not for children — Keep out of reach.”

But that didn’t seem to stop the seller or the buyers.

The girls are shown opening up the jars and smelling their newly-purchased medical marijuana.

Goldstein and his producer also observed a customer leaving the dispensary two times in one afternoon to hand off the contents inside his white bags.

The man is shown delivering the jars to two kids on the street — then he just crumples up the bag and throws it over his head.

One teen is still holding his school notebook under his arm when he is shown tossing a jar to his friend who takes a whiff to check it out.

On another occasion, Goldstein saw two teens buying and selling what appears to be medical marijuana — exchanged openly in broad daylight.

On another day, our cameras caught a group of teens collect their money. Their connection comes up to grab it. He goes into the dispensary and comes out with the tell-tale white bag.

He distributes the contents to his teenaged customers.

Goldstein then confronts the man. “You just went into the dispensary and bought pot for these guys, didn’t you?” he asks.

“I don’t know what you’re talking about,” the man replies.

Goldstein tries again. “We just saw you go in there and you bought pot for these guys.”

This time the man hit our camera and also made an obscene gesture.

The teens also had nothing to say.

“How old are you?” he asked several.

Goldstein then asked to speak to a manager at the dispensary.

He was told the manager “wasn’t around” and that a security guard hired by the store to police the area said he didn’t see anything going on.

“You are the security guard, you don’t see these people coming in here and then selling to kids right around the corner?,” Goldstein asks, “and you don’t see anything, right?”

The guard closed the door.

Residents said they see it and complained to police and nothing was done.

“Well, it’s very frustrating,” said resident Dazzier Jimenez, “because you know, we have kids around the area, so they see that. It’s a bad example for our youth.”

Goldstein asked City Attorney Mike Feuer why this dispensary was allowed to remain open.

His office oversees LA’s Prop D marijuana law. He said the dispensary complies with all the written requirements, as far as being a safe distance from schools and parks.

After we told him what was going on, authorities acted.

“I can report that because you provided us with that location,” Feuer said, “the police conducted an investigation at the site and last evening they arrested an individual, an adult for allegedly selling medical marijuana to a minor just outside the facility.”

The manager of the dispensary also emailed Goldstein.

“We are doing everything in our power to stop the illegal patient solicitations outside of the building and to also stop second-hand transactions from happening,” the manager wrote.

Residents wonder why it took so long.

“Why are there now arrests when there haven’t been any in the past?,” said Jimenez.

“Quite frankly,” says LAPD Commander Andrew Smith,  “it was not a big problem location. It was not known to us as a problem location.”

Police and prosecutors told Goldstein that after seeing CBS2’s undercover video, they are now cracking down.

David Goldstein, CBS2 News

[Editor’s note: The City Attorney’s office has shut down more than 400 medical marijuana dispensaries since Prop D was enacted less than two years ago.]