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Discover Minerals in JV with Syngar in industrial hemp deal


THE 50 HOTTEST COMPANIES IN BIOENERGY
2013-2014

1. Solazyme
2. LanzaTech
3. KiOR
4. Sapphire Energy
5. Gevo
6. Beta Renewables
7. POET
8. INEOS Bio
9. GranBio
10. DSM

11. DuPont Industrial Biosciences
12. Novozymes
13. Abengoa Bioenergy
14. Enerkem
15. Amyris
16. CoolPlanet Energy Systems
17. Joule Unlimited
18. Neste Oil
19. Virent
20. Ceres

21. Renewable Energy Group
22. Butamax
23. Mascoma
24. Honeywell’s UOP
25. Algenol
26. BP Biofuels
27. Sweetwater Energy
28. Fulcrum BioEnergy
29. Propel Fuels
30. ZeaChem

31. Waste Management
32. LS9
33. Elevance Renewable Sciences
34. Renmatix
35. OPX Biotechnologies
36. EdeniQ
37. American Process
38. Boeing
39. Fiberight
40. BASF

41. Codexis
42. Valero
43. Cobalt Technologies
44. Cosan
45. SG Biofuels
46. Dyadic
47. Midori Renewables
48. Coskata
49. Cellana
50. Virdia (tie)
50. Iogen (tie)



THE 30 HOTTEST COMPANIES IN BIOBASED CHEMICALS MATERIALS
2013-2014

1 Genomatica
2 Solazyme
3 Myriant
4 Lanzatech
5 Elevance
6 Amyris
7 DSM
8 Gevo
9 Dupont
10 Novozymes

11 BASF
12 OPX Biotechnologies
13 BioAmber
14 Beta Renewables / Chemtex
15 Avantium
16 Virent
17 Renmatix
18 Braskem
19 Enerkem
20 KiOR

21 Verdezyne
22 Sweetwater Energy
23 Cobalt
24 Segetis
25 LS9
26 INEOS Bio
27 Global Bioenergies
28 Rivertop Renewables
29 Ceres
30 Midori Renewables

Street Skag Dealer Or Synthetic Cannabinoid Pusher. What's The

Chris Bovey of Totnes. Europe's 'Mr Big' In Synthetic Cannabinoids.

Chris Bovey of Totnes. Europe’s ‘Mr Big’ In Synthetic Cannabinoids.

Synthetic Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists (let’s call them synthetic cannabinoids) are highly toxic, dangerous substances associated with a range of extremely serious, potentially fatal, medical conditions.

Synthetic cannabinoids are intended to mimic the effects of  THC but they can be 50 or even 100 times more potent.  They also bind more tightly to the CB1 receptor meaning the effect can be more intense and longer lasting.  They are nothing like real cannabis.  They don’t have the balancing effect of CBD and other cannabinoids.  There is no ‘entourage effect‘, now known to be the real engine of the therapeutic and pleasant effects of real cannabis.

Cannabis is probably  the least toxic, therapeutic and psychoactive substances known to science but these nasty chemicals are the very opposite.  Why would anyone sell them? They are the product of prohibition and sold by immoral, irresponsible, exploitative drug dealers who are no better than those that sell dirty heroin or crack on the streets to the most vulnerable people.  Most synthetic cannabinoids are sold to children, teenagers or very young adults.

Synthetic cannabinoids are associated with seizure, stroke, severe kidney problems, panic attacks, cardiac arrest, severe psychotic episodes, fever, dehydration, paranoia, hallucinations, supraventricular tachycardia - the list goes on and on.

Chris Bovey of Totnes claims to have made more than £500,000.00 from selling Spice.

Chris Bovey claims to have made more than £500,000.00 from selling Spice.

Of course, you have no idea what you’re getting, which synthetic cannabinoid is in the ‘Spice‘ or ‘K2‘ that you’ve been sold or, indeed, whether there’s a cocktail.  Many of these products sold as ‘legal highs‘ actually contain substances that have been banned,  so buying them doesn’t  even protect you from prosecution.  Well it might, or it might not.  You just don’t know.  The shops that sell these products have no idea what’s in them either.

You have no idea how they are manufactured, in what conditions, using what precursors or what dangerous chemical processes.  You have no idea how they are mixed into herbal material if they look like weed or into a squidgy black substance if they look like hash.  I’ve seen Chris Bovey of Totnes, Europe’s biggest dealer in synthetic cannabinoids, mix his fake hash.  He uses a food mixer and just adds random amounts of anonymous white powder to whatever is the base substance.  God knows what that already contains.

Bovey told me that he has a chemist working in Austria who comes up with the compounds for his ‘legal highs‘.  He then uses laboratories in China to manufacture them.  He showed me a canister, rather like a large tea caddy, covered in Chinese writing and symbols.  There was no measurement of any sort.  He just tipped several slugs of the powder into the mixing bowl and then a bit more for luck.

Stuart Wyatt, Violent Troll.

Stuart Wyatt, Violent Troll.

Of course, I do have an axe to grind where Bovey is concerned.  He is now the principal funder and organiser of the hate campaign against me.  See the website: The Truth Behind The Peter Reynolds Hate Campaign.  The campaign was initially started by the notorious and violent troll, Stuart Wyatt, shortly after I was elected leader of CLEAR (then known as the Legalise Cannabis Alliance) but Bovey has been the main driving force for more than two years.

I do wonder though whether his motives are more sinister. Why would Bovey, who claims to have made more than £500,000.00 personally from selling  ‘Spice‘, want to see cannabis legalised?  It doesn’t really make any sense.  His role in the time he spent at CLEAR, in setting up NORML UK and in focusing most of his effort on the campaign against me, may be about subverting the cannabis campaign in the UK.  He has certainly succeeded in creating massive negative energy and meanwhile his ‘legal highs‘ empire is expanding worldwide, even as far as Japan.

Irrespective of Bovey’s involvement in this nasty business, steer well clear of synthetic cannabinoids.  I am not calling for them to be banned.  That would only drive them underground and create yet another criminal market.  The real answer is to legalise, regulate and tax cannabis and MDMA, both relatively safe substances.  If we did that then the market for these horrible synthetics would dry up.  New Zealand has gone halfway there already with its Psychoactive Substances Act 2013,  very intelligent and progressive legislation.  It’s a model that the rest of the world would do well to follow and I see no reason why cannabis and MDMA couldn’t be included in it.

References:

Synthetic cannabis risk ‘vast’: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/global-drug-survey/9945906/Synthetic-cannabis-risk-vast

Synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and psychosis: An explorative study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871611000639

Severe Toxicity Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15563650.2011.609822

The synthetic cannabinoid Spice as a trigger for an acute exacerbation of cannabis induced recurrent psychotic episodes: http://www.schres-journal.com/article/S0920-9964(09)00591-X/abstract

Understanding the dangers of the fake marijuana called ‘Spice’ or ‘K2′: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002112426.htm

Why Synthetic Marijuana Is More Dangerous Than the Real Thing: http://www.livescience.com/18646-synthetic-marijuana-dangerous-health.html

Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Synthetic Cannabinoid Use: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6206a1.htm

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Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

Marijuana-Spirituality2

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst

Families flee Kansas and Missouri so sick kids can get medical

No hurry. One night last week, he happily chomped on string cheese and broccoli. Well, spit broccoli out anyway, the florets landing on the toy frog in his lap.

Otis is 2. He and little ones like him have become the new face of America’s discussion about marijuana. Forget Bill Maher and Willie Nelson for now — that’s old weed thinking.

Now it’s about kids who suffer hundreds of seizures every day because of epilepsy and other neurological disorders. A growing number of health professionals, buoyed by new research and positive results, say medical marijuana, specifically an oil extract called Charlotte’s Web, can help those children.

The big question is, why do these families have to move to Colorado to get it? Even the national Epilepsy Foundation says the treatment should be available everywhere. It’s made in Colorado Springs, but if people bring it home to a non-medical marijuana state, such as Kansas or Missouri, they could be arrested.

Margaret Gedde, a doctor in Colorado Springs, blames people clinging to a decades-old resistance right out of “Reefer Madness.” And until change comes, families known as “medical marijuana refugees” are streaming to Colorado.

“As success stories get out and word spreads, they are coming here from everywhere,” said Gedde, a pathologist who has encouraged dozens of families to make the move from as far away as Florida.

“We see them every day.”

That’s what Otis’ mom and dad are doing. Otis, who turns 3 in June, can’t walk or talk. In February, he broke a leg because constant medication weakened his bones.

But he smiles. His life is what he knows.

Kathy and Ryan Reed have tried everything to help him. Various doctors, different hospitals, ketogenic diet, two pages of drugs. Nothing worked. Then they heard about Charlotte’s Web. So the family is leaving Baldwin City, Kan. — and jobs and family — in May for Colorado Springs.

“Anybody in our shoes would do the same thing,” Ryan Reed said.

Through the Internet and social media, the refugees find each other. They exchange stories, compare notes and help with one another’s kids. A woman who moved last year from Gladstone with her daughter said she has more than 400 families on a Facebook page.

It could soon be the faces of children such as Otis Reed and June Jessee, a toddler in St. Louis, that legislators will see on large video screens in chambers as laws are challenged in the 29 states that do not allow medical marijuana.

And of course, Charlotte Figi, a little girl with a genetic disorder called Dravet syndrome that causes catastrophic seizures. She was so sick — her heart stopped twice — that her parents signed a “do not resuscitate” order.

Then they tried the marijuana oil — and it worked. She is the Charlotte of Charlotte’s Web.

“Marijuana can end the suffering of children with seizures,” Gedde said by phone from her office. “Who wants to be against that?”

Critics argue that a medical marijuana law is just a steppingstone to statutes allowing recreational use. They say that it would make pot easier for teens to get and that it would lead to harder drugs. They also point to all the approved drugs that are available.

The big “no” comes from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which continues to say that marijuana “has a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision” and that “no sound scientific studies supported medical use of marijuana.”

But the American Medical Association, along with other health organizations, recently called for more research.

Proponents such as the refugee families want people to look at a website called Face of Cannabis, at faceofcannabis.wordpress.com. It shows their children and tells their stories.

Ryan and Kathy Reed think medical marijuana will be legal everywhere in a few years, but they can’t wait. Otis needs help now, said Kathy Reed, who works at the University of Kansas.

“It’s just unfortunate that we have to pack up and leave our lives to go get medicine that may save my son’s life,” she said.


These marijuana refugees don’t rival in numbers the dream chasers of the California gold rush or the downtrodden who migrated west during the Great Depression.

But they have one thing those earlier seekers lacked. Or, rather, they lack something the earlier ones possessed.

“We don’t have a choice,” said Matt Jessee, whose 2-year-old daughter, June, suffers daily seizures from epilepsy. “Really, what else can you do when it’s your child? If you think it could help, don’t you have to go?”

He is wrapping up law school and works for the Bryan Cave legal firm in St. Louis. His wife, Genny, recently testified before a Missouri House committee considering medical marijuana.

Matt Jessee blames federal drug policy that continues to categorize marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, which means it has no accepted medical use.

He rejects criticism that asks, why try medical marijuana when we don’t know whether it will work? He said his family didn’t know whether the other medications would work either, and they didn’t. One, he said, had a 3 percent chance of working, and a possible side effect was death.

“We can’t wait any longer,” he said of the family’s move to Denver. “Sure, it’s a tough move. All our family is here, and we don’t know anybody out there. But every day June has seizures delays her development, so we can’t wait any longer.

“This is about hope.”

Philip M. Gattone, president and chief executive officer of the national Epilepsy Foundation, along with board chairman Warren Lammert, said parents need to have the legal option to get medical marijuana for their children.

The current situation is not acceptable, they said.

“Families looking to access medical marijuana as a treatment are facing terrible decisions,” Gattone said. “One parent may move across the country to live with a child to seek this treatment. Other families may uproot entirely, including leaving their job, to move where they can access CBD oil,” referring to Charlotte’s Web.

The thick, amber-colored oil is made by a dispensary in Colorado Springs. The process renders the oil high in cannabidiol, or CBD, a chemical in cannabis thought to have medicinal properties, but removes most of the tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive part of pot that gets users high.

The treatment, sometimes administered by a drop under the tongue, is not covered by insurance, but financial help is available. A typical month’s supply runs about $300.

Orrin Devinsky, a professor of neurology at New York University and director of the school’s Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, said he supports the treatment and the country’s overall momentum toward medical marijuana.

“If I were Charlotte Figi’s parents and lived in Colorado, I would have done exactly what they did,” Devinsky says on the Epilepsy Foundation’s website. “And as a doctor, I would gladly prescribe marijuana products for many of my patients who failed existing therapies if it were legal in my state.”

Jim Guthrie of Lawrence wishes Charlotte’s Web would have come along when his daughter was younger. Julia is now 20. He remembers when her school wouldn’t let her attend class unless she was in a wheelchair and wearing a helmet.

“All the seizures — it was hell,” Guthrie said. “Watching your daughter be tortured and being helpless to stop it.

“These families moving to Colorado — they know the hell I mean. They’re desperate for something to help their kids. I would go in a heartbeat.

“I want to be clear on that: I would break the law. When it’s your child, it’s a no-brainer.”

Holly Brown and her daughter, Sydney, moved from Gladstone to Colorado a year ago. Her story is like the others’ — they tried everything, but nothing worked.

She said Sydney, 10, has shown remarkable improvement with the oil.

“I’ve seen incredible things,” Brown said. “And not just with Sydney, but others I’ve gotten to know out here. Kids sitting up the first time, holding up their heads, saying their first words.

“Most of us just wanted help with seizures. But we’re seeing improvement with cognitive skills and memory.”

Legislation has been introduced in Missouri and Kansas. Proponents in Missouri think voters could see a ballot referendum perhaps within a couple of years. Polling, they say, shows widespread and growing support. Democrats and Republicans in the General Assembly have spoken in favor.

Genny Jessee, June’s mom, doesn’t understand why it hasn’t happened yet and why a Missouri family must move to get help for a child.

“We’ve been through so much, and this is just something else we have to do,” she said. “Just like others, our support system is here. Our family is here. June’s therapists are here. So from that standpoint, it’s very hard. But thankfully, Matt’s firm has an office in Denver, so financially we can afford it.

“But some people can’t, and that’s not right.”


Otis likes to swing outside. Likes the sun and the breeze.

Lots of both of those things are at his grandparents’ place in a rural area of Baldwin City. The family moved there when Ryan Reed quit his teaching job so he could take Otis to doctor appointments and therapy sessions.

Kathy Reed needed to keep her job at KU for the family’s health insurance.

Ryan’s parents, Donna and David Reed, are glad to have them. They like to hear Otis giggle as he rolls on the living room floor. He’s their only grandchild.

“They’ve been through so much and tried so many things,” Donna Reed said one evening last week in the kitchen.

She and her husband fully support the move to Colorado.

“You’ll do anything for your kids,” said David Reed, who works at Baker University. “That’s just how it is.”

Ryan Reed will go out soon to find a place to live. At first, the plan called for his wife to stay here and work, but KU is now offering to let her telecommute for her job.

Ryan Reed said it’s easier knowing they are not alone.

“Those of us doing this are learning from each other,” he said.

His parents are already making plans to visit. Donna Reed said there might even be a move in their future, too.

David Reed nodded. Yes, he would go along. He looked toward his wife.

“It’s looking like it’s that or me staying here by myself.”

The Pothead Stereotype Lives, Even Among Americans Ready To

Americans may be ready to let people smoke marijuana legally, but they still take a rather dim view of those who do, a new HuffPost/YouGov poll shows. A definite stigma remains — though Americans don’t think every stereotype holds true.

First, the better news: By a 43 percent to 37 percent margin, Americans were more likely to reject the idea that most pot smokers are “stupid” than to agree that most are. And respondents divided about equally on whether to call most pot smokers “lazy,” with 39 percent saying they are and 37 percent saying they’re not.

Then again, Americans don’t necessarily think marijuana users are “normal” either: By a 42 percent to 34 percent margin, more respondents said that the word does not describe most pot smokers than that it does. They were also more likely than not to call most pot smokers “unmotivated,” by a 43 percent to 35 percent margin. By a 54 percent to 14 percent margin, they said the word “successful” does not describe most marijuana users. And by a 54 percent to 27 percent margin, they said most marijuana smokers can be described as “potheads.”

A previous HuffPost/YouGov poll showed that Americans gave more credit to those who were described as “occasionally” smoking marijuana. That survey found that, by a 59 percent to 28 percent margin, most Americans think a person can be a responsible adult and still smoke pot now and then. And by a 45 percent to 35 percent margin, a plurality of Americans thought that most of those occasional smokers are responsible adults.

Americans in the newest poll divided along party lines in describing marijuana smokers. Republicans tended to agree they’re lazy (47 percent to 34 percent), unmotivated (56 percent to 27 percent) and not normal (55 percent to 29 percent). Republicans were also slightly more likely than not to call them stupid (42 percent to 39 percent).

Democrats didn’t feel as strongly, but largely said pot users are not lazy (43 percent to 33 percent), unmotivated (42 percent to 35 percent) or stupid (48 percent to 35 percent). Democrats divided 39 percent to 36 percent on whether marijuana smokers are normal.

Independents fell somewhere in between, with pluralities judging marijuana users to be lazy (40 percent to 33 percent), unmotivated (42 percent to 34 percent) and not normal (40 percent to 33 percent), but not stupid (41 percent to 35 percent).

Few Americans from any group, though, said that most marijuana users are successful.

Another thing on which most Americans agree, regardless of political ideology: If you smoke marijuana, you probably are a pothead. Majorities of Republicans (61 percent to 22 percent) and independents (56 percent to 24 percent) and a plurality of Democrats (46 percent to 34 percent) said they think that word describes most marijuana smokers.

Despite these uncomplimentary words, most Americans support legalization. In a HuffPost/YouGov poll conducted in February, 51 percent — including 62 percent of Democrats, 52 percent of independents and only 32 percent of Republicans — said marijuana should be legal. Other recent polls have also largely found that half or more of Americans are ready to legalize.

The HuffPost/YouGov poll was conducted April 15-17 among 1,000 U.S. adults using a sample selected from YouGov’s opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population. Factors considered include age, race, gender, education, employment, income, marital status, number of children, voter registration, time and location of Internet access, interest in politics, religion and church attendance.

The Huffington Post has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov’s nationally representative opinion polling.

Saying 'no' to not drugs: Industrial hemp and marijuana law reform

APRIL9grampantsbrown

Please don’t smoke this man’s pants. He will be angry, and you will not think it’s funny because you won’t be high. Photo: The Hempest

When the RI General Assembly passed a law prohibiting smoking in public places, it made our restaurants and bars healthier places for their patrons and employees. Sure was a step in the right direction, but what was not a widely publicized fact after the law passed was that the following year, organizations like Save the Bay and Keep America Beautiful noticed a distinct uptick in the amount of cigarette butts cleaned up from our beaches and waterways. As it happens, when you make people smoke outside, they tend to throw their cigarette butts on the ground.

Anyone with a basic understanding of, well, life in general, is familiar with unintended consequences. They are the unforeseen hiccups and downright disasters that accompany all decisions made. Most of the time, they are quite bad, but sometimes they can be good. The law of unintended consequences certainly rears it’s head when laws get passed without adequate scrutiny, but there is a very serious positive aspect to legalizing, taxing, and regulating marijuana use that no one has mentioned in the debate.

This law could help Rhode Island’s farming community. I’m not suggesting that all of Rhode Island’s farmers start growing high-grade Wacky Tobaccy; what I am suggesting is that this law opens the door for industrial hemp production.

What if RI’s farmers could legally plant, as a cover crop or for use in crop rotation and soil remediation, a plant that grows tall and quickly – which prevents the need for herbicides – and that has an abundance of uses and  high market value? How about a plant that can break disease cycles and blights in other plants? I’d imagine that most farmers would jump at the chance.

Imagine the potential economic impacts to our all-but-dead manufacturing sector if we could provide a local, sustainable raw material for use in creating ultra-durable cloths and yarns. Industrial hemp is a fast growing plant whose oil can be used in biofuel production and as a feedstock for plastics. It is well known that acre-for-acre, industrial hemp vastly outperforms timber in paper production.

Hemp has a place in the building trades as well. It’s fibers can be used to make insulation, pressed into fiberboard, and even used as an additive in concrete to make it lighter, stronger, and lessen the environmental impact of concrete production.

Hemp could also play a part in reclaiming contaminated lands. Though the practice is still in it’s infancy, hemp shows good potential as a phytoremediator. In fact, hemp was and has been used to remediate contamination of fly ash, sewage sludge, and heavy metals. It was even used to remediate radioactive soil in and around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

The only thing stopping industrial hemp production in the United States is the fact that drug laws make no distinction between won’t-get-you-high-but-has-a-bajillion-other-benefits hemp, and the other I’m-not-as-think-as-you-stoned-I am strains of the cannabis plant. I think it’s time to make that distinction.

Throwing hemp into the same drug schedule as its more potent cousins is like saying there is no difference between a bottle of water and a fine Belgian tripel. One of them is extremely useful, can be consumed, and won’t degrade your faculties. The other has been known to throw even the most seasoned beer drinker for a loop after just one glass. The beer nerd in me finds this insulting.

(Note: As per federal law, it is currently LEGAL to grow industrial hemp in the U.S. You just need a permit from the DEA. Good luck with that.)

Related posts:

  1. Parents: Proper Marijuana Reform Protects Families
  2. Judge drops marijuana citation against RI Future editor

Street Skag Dealer Or Synthetic Cannabinoid Pusher. What's The

Chris Bovey of Totnes. Europe's 'Mr Big' In Synthetic Cannabinoids.

Chris Bovey of Totnes. Europe’s ‘Mr Big’ In Synthetic Cannabinoids.

Synthetic Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists (let’s call them synthetic cannabinoids) are highly toxic, dangerous substances associated with a range of extremely serious, potentially fatal, medical conditions.

Synthetic cannabinoids are intended to mimic the effects of  THC but they can be 50 or even 100 times more potent.  They also bind more tightly to the CB1 receptor meaning the effect can be more intense and longer lasting.  They are nothing like real cannabis.  They don’t have the balancing effect of CBD and other cannabinoids.  There is no ‘entourage effect‘, now known to be the real engine of the therapeutic and pleasant effects of real cannabis.

Cannabis is probably  the least toxic, therapeutic and psychoactive substances known to science but these nasty chemicals are the very opposite.  Why would anyone sell them? They are the product of prohibition and sold by immoral, irresponsible, exploitative drug dealers who are no better than those that sell dirty heroin or crack on the streets to the most vulnerable people.  Most synthetic cannabinoids are sold to children, teenagers or very young adults.

Synthetic cannabinoids are associated with seizure, stroke, severe kidney problems, panic attacks, cardiac arrest, severe psychotic episodes, fever, dehydration, paranoia, hallucinations, supraventricular tachycardia - the list goes on and on.

Chris Bovey of Totnes claims to have made more than £500,000.00 from selling Spice.

Chris Bovey claims to have made more than £500,000.00 from selling Spice.

Of course, you have no idea what you’re getting, which synthetic cannabinoid is in the ‘Spice‘ or ‘K2‘ that you’ve been sold or, indeed, whether there’s a cocktail.  Many of these products sold as ‘legal highs‘ actually contain substances that have been banned,  so buying them doesn’t  even protect you from prosecution.  Well it might, or it might not.  You just don’t know.  The shops that sell these products have no idea what’s in them either.

You have no idea how they are manufactured, in what conditions, using what precursors or what dangerous chemical processes.  You have no idea how they are mixed into herbal material if they look like weed or into a squidgy black substance if they look like hash.  I’ve seen Chris Bovey of Totnes, Europe’s biggest dealer in synthetic cannabinoids, mix his fake hash.  He uses a food mixer and just adds random amounts of anonymous white powder to whatever is the base substance.  God knows what that already contains.

Bovey told me that he has a chemist working in Austria who comes up with the compounds for his ‘legal highs‘.  He then uses laboratories in China to manufacture them.  He showed me a canister, rather like a large tea caddy, covered in Chinese writing and symbols.  There was no measurement of any sort.  He just tipped several slugs of the powder into the mixing bowl and then a bit more for luck.

Stuart Wyatt, Violent Troll.

Stuart Wyatt, Violent Troll.

Of course, I do have an axe to grind where Bovey is concerned.  He is now the principal funder and organiser of the hate campaign against me.  See the website: The Truth Behind The Peter Reynolds Hate Campaign.  The campaign was initially started by the notorious and violent troll, Stuart Wyatt, shortly after I was elected leader of CLEAR (then known as the Legalise Cannabis Alliance) but Bovey has been the main driving force for more than two years.

I do wonder though whether his motives are more sinister. Why would Bovey, who claims to have made more than £500,000.00 personally from selling  ‘Spice‘, want to see cannabis legalised?  It doesn’t really make any sense.  His role in the time he spent at CLEAR, in setting up NORML UK and in focusing most of his effort on the campaign against me, may be about subverting the cannabis campaign in the UK.  He has certainly succeeded in creating massive negative energy and meanwhile his ‘legal highs‘ empire is expanding worldwide, even as far as Japan.

Irrespective of Bovey’s involvement in this nasty business, steer well clear of synthetic cannabinoids.  I am not calling for them to be banned.  That would only drive them underground and create yet another criminal market.  The real answer is to legalise, regulate and tax cannabis and MDMA, both relatively safe substances.  If we did that then the market for these horrible synthetics would dry up.  New Zealand has gone halfway there already with its Psychoactive Substances Act 2013,  very intelligent and progressive legislation.  It’s a model that the rest of the world would do well to follow and I see no reason why cannabis and MDMA couldn’t be included in it.

References:

Synthetic cannabis risk ‘vast’: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/global-drug-survey/9945906/Synthetic-cannabis-risk-vast

Synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and psychosis: An explorative study: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871611000639

Severe Toxicity Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/15563650.2011.609822

The synthetic cannabinoid Spice as a trigger for an acute exacerbation of cannabis induced recurrent psychotic episodes: http://www.schres-journal.com/article/S0920-9964(09)00591-X/abstract

Understanding the dangers of the fake marijuana called ‘Spice’ or ‘K2′: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002112426.htm

Why Synthetic Marijuana Is More Dangerous Than the Real Thing: http://www.livescience.com/18646-synthetic-marijuana-dangerous-health.html

Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Synthetic Cannabinoid Use: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6206a1.htm

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Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

Marijuana-Spirituality2

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein. I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst

Illinois drops plans to ban medical marijuana patients from owning

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