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Industrial hemp production could begin next year In Tennessee



Industrial Hemp production in Tennessee is one step closer to becoming a reality


NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Industrial Hemp production in Tennessee is one step closer to becoming a reality. Tuesday, farmers and some retailers discussed a licensing and inspection program, which is required before the state can move forward.

Farmers are already growing Industrial Hemp in Kentucky. Jeff Davis is growing it on his farm in Christian County, Kentucky.

He was approached last spring about starting a pilot program to grow the plant in Kentucky.

“We need to try to boost the economy, and this has got so much potential,” Davis said

Greta Gaines, who owned a business selling skin care products containing Industrial Hemp, was one of about 50 people at a public hearing at the Ellington Agricultural Center Tuesday.

“I’m very excited about the possibility in the future about making products from Tennessee grown hemp,” Gaines said.

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture hosted the hearing.

They’re putting together a licensing and inspection program for the production of industrial hemp in the Volunteer State.

Several farmers want to grow the crop, because it can be used to make products like food, t-shirts, tennis shoes, skin products and pharmaceuticals.

Right now, those products are imported from Canada.

“Hemp has been here for a long time and we’re just not growing it,” Colleen Sauve’ said.

Tennessee’s licensing and inspection program is important because under federal law hemp is classified as an illegal drug.

Hemp is a marijuana plant, but the level of THC is so low, it’s useless as a recreational drug.

Some farmers are concerned about inadvertently breaking the law.

“It’s a very fine line between when you’re seeds are mature and when you’re going to be spiking hot,” Harold Jarboe said.

The DEA has left marijuana producers alone in Colorado and Washington where recreational marijuana is legal.

Tennessee lawmakers expect the DEA to give Tennessee farmers the same courtesy.

Kentucky farmers got the green light to grow it last year. Next year it should happen in Tennessee.

“I don’t see what it would hurt to try something new,” Davis said.

If all goes as planned, farmers in Tennessee could begin growing Industrial Hemp in the spring.

An Introduction To The Major Cannabinoid Families | Potbotics

cannabinoidsThe use of phytocannabinoids, or marijuana, in medicine is an ancient practice, with records dating as early as 5,000 B.C. Since then, the use of marijuana has experienced a sordid history, moving in and out of popularity with conventional medical practices. Marijuana still doesn’t feel medicinal in part because it is still commonly used and perceived as a recreational drug, but also because it is a plant. Unlike chemically synthesized narcotics, the marijuana plant is an admixture of organic compounds whose relative concentrations need to be characterized. While cannabis is best known for its main psychoactive ingredient, Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the plant has many other chemical compounds, called cannabinoids that are helpful for the body and mind.

With the discovery of an internal cannabinoid system that modulates critical neural and metabolic processes such as emotion, sleep regulation and visceral fat accumulation, research into the potential uses of phytocannabinoid compounds for various medical treatments has steadily gained momentum. Evidence suggests that individual phytocannabinoids display varying degrees of selectivity for the endogenous cannabinoid (CB) and other receptors, resulting in activation of distinct signaling pathways. This highlights a need for distinguishing between the unique characteristics of each cannabinoid compound.

There have been more than 80 cannabinoid compounds identified from the Cannabis Sativa plant. These compounds are found in different ratios depending on the breed, sex and type of plant. Discussed below are the most commonly known cannabinoids used for the treatment of various diseases:

  1. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – THC is historically the predominant cannabinoid used for treating medical conditions and is the major psychoactive component of Cannabis Sativa. THC exerts itself by binding to the endogenous cannabinoid receptors, specifically CB1 and CB2, found in many tissues throughout the body. THC is believed to have anticancer effects, improve symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease, as well as have potent antioxidant properties.
  2. Cannabidiol (CBD) – CBD is arguably the most highly studied non-psychoactive extract from the Cannabis Sativa plant. CBD shows promise in the treatment of skin disorders as well as universal anti-inflammatory properties. Long term treatment with CBD has shown promise in Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, obsessive compulsive behavior, cancer, and the immuno-modulation of patients with multiple sclerosis.
  3. Cannabichromene (CBC) – CBC has demonstrated promising anti-inflammatory activity independent of the cannabinoid receptors. In vitro, CBC has been shown to impart a positive effect on the viability of neural stem progenitor cells, critical to brain function and health during differentiation.
  4. Cannabigerol (CBG) – A synthetic version of CBG has demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties as well as promise in the treatment of autoimmunity, while CBG itself has shown promise in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.
  5. Cannabielsoin (CBE) – CBE is a metabolite of Cannabidiol. As of yet, there are no described pharmacological uses for CBE.
  6. Cannabividerin (CBV) – CBV has shown significant properties in 3 models of epilepsy, independent of the CB1 receptor.
  7. Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) – The activity of THCV is novel in that it acts to simultaneously block the CB1 receptor and activate the CB2 receptor, which may have important implications in the treatment of liver disease and inflammatory-associated obesity.

There is significant potential for exploitation of the various cannabinoids based on differences in potency and efficacy. Uncertainty has no place in medical marijuana recommendation, and tools like PotBotics will inevitably streamline and elevate the medical cannabis selection and recommendation process to new industry standards.

 

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein.

I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

marijuana

Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst

7 myths about medical marijuana

Nearly half the states in the US now allow medical marijuana. But even as the drug’s legal medicinal use spreads throughout the country, there’s a lot of confusion over what, exactly, medical marijuana is all about.

Some people question whether marijuana is really medicine in the first place. Opponents often say it’s just a backdoor to the legalization of recreational pot. And some supporters make all sorts of wild claims about what the drug can treat.

Some of the issues surrounding medical marijuana are entirely subjective or still being studied, but there are a few cases in which people simply get the facts wrong. Here are seven myths about medical marijuana.

Myth #1: Marijuana can treat Ebola

In a Fox Business interview, Gary Johnson, CEO of Cannabis Sativa and former Libertarian presidential candidate, suggested that marijuana could be used to cure Ebola. There is absolutely no scientific evidence to support that claim.

But Johnson’s remarks provide a glimpse at what the commercialization of marijuana could look like. It’s common for big companies to use crises to justify policies that favor them, particularly deregulation. Johnson, in his comments, was doing exactly the same thing — regardless of the actual scientific evidence.

Myth #2: Marijuana can’t be medicine

Marijuana flows out of a medicine bottle. (Shutterstock)

The federal government’s classification for marijuana — schedule 1, the strictest category in the scheduling system — indicates that marijuana has no medical value.

The available research and various reports disagree. Several studies and anecdotal evidence suggest marijuana can be used for various medical problems, including pain, nausea and loss of appetite, Parkinson’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, PTSD, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis. Some of these treatments have been proven to work on children, particularly those with forms of epilepsy that can induce hundreds of seizures a day.

For some people, marijuana seems to be the only thing that works. One cancer patient told me in 2013 that taking marijuana eased her epilepsy, nausea, and loss of appetite. She tried conventional medication first, but none of her prescriptions were effective in addressing all of her medical problems. “Without medical marijuana, I wouldn’t be alive today,” she said. “It really has changed my life for the better.”

The federal government doesn’t give credence to the available research and anecdotes because it has a much higher threshold for medical evidence. To validate medical value through the scheduling system, the entire marijuana plant must have large-scale clinical trials to back it up — similar to what the Food and Drug Administration would expect from any other drug entering the market. But this research has also been tough to conduct because the schedule 1 classification makes it very difficult to get approval for marijuana studies.

Myth #3: Medical marijuana is de facto legalization

Opponents often characterize medical marijuana legalization as a backdoor to the full legalization of recreational pot. The argument is that most people don’t actually need marijuana for medical purposes; they’re just obtaining medical marijuana cards to use the drug recreationally. Much of this sentiment is rooted in reports of the medical marijuana program in California, which has struggled for years to get its largely unregulated medical marijuana industry under control.

But it doesn’t have to be this way — and in some places, it’s not. The medical marijuana program in New Jersey is so strict that fewer than 3,000 patients have signed up, far fewer than the tens of thousands expected. And some parents are leaving the state to get their sick children access to pot in places with laxer laws. The medical marijuana program in Washington, DC, is also fairly strict, and schemes in New York and Minnesota are expected to be tightly regulated as well.

Medical marijuana programs can also vary in many ways from state to state. Some, like California, allow medical marijuana dispensaries and home cultivation; others, such as Alaska, only allow home cultivation; and a few, including Delaware, allow dispensaries but not home cultivation.

Myth #4: Marijuana can always be broken down into components for medicine

An Israeli worker trims marijuana meant for medical uses. (Uriel Sinal / Getty Images News)

Maybe marijuana can be medicine, opponents say, but only if it’s broken down into different components. “Many plants, including marijuana, have medicinal properties,” writes Kevin Sabet of Smart Approaches to Marijuana. “But that doesn’t mean that in order to derive those medicinal benefits, we should smoke or ingest its raw, crude form. After all, we don’t smoke opium to get the benefits of morphine.”

The problem is there are hundreds of cannabinoids in marijuana — and it’s not clear how they all interact with each other. CBD, a non-psychoactive component of marijuana, may work really well for some children suffering from seizures, but it doesn’t appear to work by itself for everyone.

Joanna Buffum at New Jersey Monthly reported:

It is known that patients react to a variety of cannabinoids in the plant, not just THC and CBD. It is not known why certain cannabinoids, or a combination of several, work for some patients and not for others. For Jax Stormes, CBD by itself doesn’t work. He needs a mixture of THC, CBD and another cannabinoid, THCa.

“Everyone sees CBD as some type of miracle treatment,” says Dr. Lorraine Lazar, a pediatric neurologist at Morristown Medical Center’s Goryeb Children’s Hospital. She doesn’t agree. “I think CBD will be just like other therapies. It’s not going to be the end-all for everyone.”

Researchers are still studying all the components of marijuana to determine the full effects of each major cannabinoid. It may be possible someday to break down marijuana into its various components for more precise forms of medicine, but the science just isn’t there yet. In the meantime, many patients argue it’s better for them to get some relief through the whole marijuana plant, even if it causes an unnecessary high.

Myth #5: Marijuana isn’t medicine because it’s smoked

A person smokes a marijuana joint. (Shutterstock)

Opponents of medical marijuana legalization, including SAM and the Drug Enforcement Administration, often argue that pot isn’t medicine because it’s smoked. Even a landmark study by the Institute of Medicine that supported medical marijuana suggested that smoking the drug is risky.

But a lot of people who smoke medicinal marijuana get medical benefits from it. Marijuana also doesn’t have to be smoked; it can be consumed through vaporization, pills, edibles, dabs, and patches. Some medical marijuana states, like New York and Minnesota, even prohibit patients from smoking pot.

Myth #6: Medical marijuana is politically controversial

With the way politicians approach medical marijuana, one would think that it’s still a very touchy subject. Even Hillary Clinton, widely expected to be the Democratic presidential contender in 2016, has said she only supports medical marijuana “for people who are in extreme medical conditions” and “under appropriate circumstances,” and she wants more research before she makes up her mind on the issue.

But medical marijuana actually has massive bipartisan support among voters across the country. A 2010 Pew Research Center survey found 73 percent of American voters support medical marijuana, including 61 percent of Republicans. Even when the medical marijuana amendment lost in Florida on November 4, it got nearly 58 percent of the vote — more votes than re-elected Gov. Rick Scott, but not enough to meet Florida’s 60 percent requirement for constitutional amendments.

Myth #7: The federal government patents medical marijuana

Almost every article I write about medical marijuana or the drug scheduling system is followed by tweets and emails asking about the federal government’s patent on the medical use of marijuana. The messages, mostly from legalization supporters, argue that if the federal government patents medical marijuana, then surely the feds know the drug has medical value and should be rescheduled.

But the federal government doesn’t patent medical marijuana. It patents the medical use of some compounds in marijuana, including CBD. The patent specifically avoids psychoactive cannabinoids, like THC, and doesn’t include the whole marijuana plant.

The patent also doesn’t prove marijuana has medical value, although it does acknowledge the drug’s medical potential. For the purposes of rescheduling, though, the federal government needs large-scale clinical trials similar to what the FDA requires for other drugs, not a simple nod at potential.

DC, Oregon, and Alaska Just Voted to Legalize Marijuana | Mother

Oregon and Alaska are renowned for their pot-smoking libertarians, hippies, and hipsters, but they’re no match for the blazer-and-khaki-clad stoners in the nation’s capital. That’s right. DC’s marijuana legalization measure, Initiative 71, which was predicted to sail through by a 2-1 margin, has officially passed by an even larger margin. Okay, not officially passed, but, you know, the big media guys called it and…and…what was I writing about again?

Oh, yeah. So, pot easily passes in DC and, by a smaller margin in Oregon, and by just two points in Alaska. How to explain this, other than Sen. Mitch McConnell’s well-known addiction to Grand Daddy Purp?

If the DC vote caught you by surprise, then consider our capital’s long, intimate relationship with the cannabis plant. The Declaration of Independence was written on hemp paper. George Washington urged his gardener to “make the most” of Indian hemp seed, which, translated into modern English, obviously means cooking it into hash oil and smoking dabs from an oil rig. (If you don’t know what I’m talking about then you clearly don’t live in DC.) The point is, DC was cool before Portland even fucking existed.

When I was in college in the late 1990s, I visited DC, where I bought some low-grade pot from some young black dude on the street. Such purchases happen all the time in DC, and when things go wrong, it’s usually the young dealer, not the stoned college kid, who winds up in jail. The disparities are well known within the District’s African American community: Blacks make up about half of the DC population but accounted for 90 percent of its arrests for drug possession, according to a study last year. And while, according to the Washington Post, African Americans in the District once tended to oppose legalization for fear it could lead to more young blacks getting addicted, they now support it as the same rate as whites do.

The most obvious reason that DC suits could get legal pot is that there’s no rural DC—unless you count the cherry trees around the Washington Monument, which I don’t. However, this map shows the vast swath of Oregon hinterlands that backed Mitt Romney in 2012. That tiny blue sliver resembling the Gaza Strip is Portland.

But pro-pot voters in DC still face an uphill battle. While Washington is the most liberal place in America after San Francisco, (so says The Economist), it is also home to Congress, a slightly less progressive institution, which happens to control the District’s purse strings and has 30 days to review and nullify any new DC law. Republican Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland, pictured above (he’s the guy without the tea), has pledged to “blunt” the DC pot rule, as Politico aptly put it. Getting the rest of Congress to follow suit might get a lot easier if, as some pro-pot campaigners fear, thousands of ecstatic stoners spark up on the streets tonight.

These legalization measures weren’t the only marijuana initiatives on the ballot Tuesday. Florida was supposed to be the first state in the South to legalize medical marijuana, but support for the measure took a nosedive, and it has lost by a fairly big margin. (Slate‘s Michael Ames blames “dysfunctional partisanship.”) There are also local measures on the ballot in several states. And for what it’s worth, a medical-marijuana referendum passed today by a 12-point margin in Guam, which is certain to give a boost to this song:

Ohio: Industrial Hemp Finds A Home In Health & Wellness Programs

IndustrialHempStack

Cleveland Hunger Network Partners with New Omega-Fats Initiative for Mental Health Month

Twenty States Have Legalized Industrial Hemp By Wide Margins, With Major Health Institutions Giving the Nod to Hemp’s Protein-Rich Nutrition

With interest in food, farming, wellness, and all-things-cannabis are on the rise, industrial hemp is attracting a fan base broader than “hipsters” and vegetarians that may first come to mind. Major health institutions are now on board, giving the nod to the nutritional quality of hemp’s protein-rich seeds, and assuring people eating them will not cause failed drug tests.

The productivity of Canadian hemp producers has gone up in recent years, bringing more affordable hempseed foods to grocery stores and vitamin websites. Politically, hemp is a rare bipartisan issue, as evidenced by the 20 states that have legalized the crop by wide margins, defining it as a distinct variety of cannabis sativa, having .03 percent THC or less (no drug/narcotic value).

This is welcome reform for Plant Kingdom Bakery owner Jeremy Koosed, who claims to have discussed the subject of hemp for nutrition with hundreds of thousands of people. For the past five years, the Lyndhurst-based “snackery” has been onhand with hempseed foods and information at community festivals and farmers markets. Coffee shop baristas have also helped clarify the subject for customers, as Phoenix Coffee locations in Cleveland and Nervous Dog in Akron have made Plant Kingdom snacks available since 2009.

“Omega Fats Action Network” is a new initiative Koosed began recently, using social media to promote greater reliance on plant sources of Omega-3s like hemp, flax, and chia seeds. With several strategic partnerships, it’s beginning to take on the facets of a serious public health and environmental campaign.

Plant Kindgom has been distributing recipe fliers for over a year on how to use hemp seeds and oil. “But the sheets aren’t cutting it,” Koosed said, “so OFAN is a broader service to address fat-intake imbalances and increase awareness of brain-supportive food options.”

With fish oil as one of the largest vitamin sectors, Koosed thinks promotion of seed foods can play a larger role in ocean conservation. Taking a pragmatic approach, he encourages relying on plants “to a greater extent” because, he says, “with all the threats to marine life, choosing more plant sources is a natural response that will afford cleaner fats for our bodies in the long-run anyway. It’s a win-win!”

Hemp In Health Services

The Hunger Network of Greater Cleveland is promoting all sources of Omega 3 fats, including hemp seeds, through their Stay Well Program, which does nutrition education at 11 hot meal and pantry sites.

November is Stay Well’s Mental Health Awareness Month. At participating locations community can access health checkups with medical students, and gain nutrition and lifestyle information to promote mental and emotional wellness. Free samples of toasted hemp seeds and recipes sheets are given out as attendees learn about the importance of healthy fat sources, and how Omegas function as building blocks of our brain cell membranes.

“With omega fat-intake, it could boost wellness in several manners when people switch to healthier fats and elevate intake of Omega-3s, which many people are deficient in,” said Sara Continenza, coordinator of Stay Well. “Our pantry clients are learning how easy it can be to incorporate healthier lifestyle choices into their daily routine.”

At Cleveland Clinic’s celebration for National Food Day, nutritional luminaries presented mounting evidence on the benefits of plant-strong eating. Mark Hyman MD, head of the Clinic’s new Functional Medicine department, presented to a packed auditorium on the many ways food can be medicine. Jane Esselsyn, wife of renowned vegan Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, presented on the utility of a plant-based diet to avert heart disease.

And Plant Kingdom was there, sharing with lines of clinic nurses and staff. Increased access to nutrient dense, wholesome plant foods is growing priority for many health care providers, providing an opening for companies like Plant Kingdom, whose snacks are stocked at the Clinic’s Wellness Shop and natural vending machines at Louis Stokes VA Medical Center in University Circle.

At John Carroll University’s wellness fair last week, hemp and omega-fats issue was of interest to many students. JCU Environmental Club Organizer Monica Angelotti pledged to share the nutritional information, saying “By growing and using the hemp plant, we can conserve resources as well as reduce the need for mass meat production which undoubtedly has detrimental effects on our air, water and our own health.’’

Rising Demand and Resumed Growth of Hemp in US This Season, a Sign of Hope to Foodies and Farmers

This seasons’ Canadian hemp harvest was 25 percent larger than in 2013, and that growth is a primary reason many American farm organizations now endorse tapping into hemp’s development potential for the countryside. US policy now reflects this interest in diversifying with hemp.

The Farm Bill was renewed with a rider allowing states with hemp farming permitting laws to plant hemp for research purposes. While Ohio has no state policy on hemp farming, Ohio U.S. House Reps. Democrat Tim Ryan and Republican Steve Stivers are co-sponsors of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act which would define it a a non-drug crop, distinct from drug marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act.

Rumors are that House Speaker John Boehner may get the legalization bill before Committee soon if it attracts more co-sponsors. Koosed from Plant Kingdom has met with Rep. Marcia Fudge’s office to explore the potential for more robust education around plant foods and healthier fat sources.

The positive feedback from the Hunger Network’s Stay Well Program is a good indication that seed sources of Omega 3s will continue to play a growing role in the development of wellness and mental health programming.

For more information about the Hunger Network’s Stay well program contact scontinenza@hungernetwork.org .

Visit Plant Kingdom at www.plantkingdombakery.com .

An Introduction To The Major Cannabinoid Families | Potbotics

cannabinoidsThe use of phytocannabinoids, or marijuana, in medicine is an ancient practice, with records dating as early as 5,000 B.C. Since then, the use of marijuana has experienced a sordid history, moving in and out of popularity with conventional medical practices. Marijuana still doesn’t feel medicinal in part because it is still commonly used and perceived as a recreational drug, but also because it is a plant. Unlike chemically synthesized narcotics, the marijuana plant is an admixture of organic compounds whose relative concentrations need to be characterized. While cannabis is best known for its main psychoactive ingredient, Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the plant has many other chemical compounds, called cannabinoids that are helpful for the body and mind.

With the discovery of an internal cannabinoid system that modulates critical neural and metabolic processes such as emotion, sleep regulation and visceral fat accumulation, research into the potential uses of phytocannabinoid compounds for various medical treatments has steadily gained momentum. Evidence suggests that individual phytocannabinoids display varying degrees of selectivity for the endogenous cannabinoid (CB) and other receptors, resulting in activation of distinct signaling pathways. This highlights a need for distinguishing between the unique characteristics of each cannabinoid compound.

There have been more than 80 cannabinoid compounds identified from the Cannabis Sativa plant. These compounds are found in different ratios depending on the breed, sex and type of plant. Discussed below are the most commonly known cannabinoids used for the treatment of various diseases:

  1. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) – THC is historically the predominant cannabinoid used for treating medical conditions and is the major psychoactive component of Cannabis Sativa. THC exerts itself by binding to the endogenous cannabinoid receptors, specifically CB1 and CB2, found in many tissues throughout the body. THC is believed to have anticancer effects, improve symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease, as well as have potent antioxidant properties.
  2. Cannabidiol (CBD) – CBD is arguably the most highly studied non-psychoactive extract from the Cannabis Sativa plant. CBD shows promise in the treatment of skin disorders as well as universal anti-inflammatory properties. Long term treatment with CBD has shown promise in Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, obsessive compulsive behavior, cancer, and the immuno-modulation of patients with multiple sclerosis.
  3. Cannabichromene (CBC) – CBC has demonstrated promising anti-inflammatory activity independent of the cannabinoid receptors. In vitro, CBC has been shown to impart a positive effect on the viability of neural stem progenitor cells, critical to brain function and health during differentiation.
  4. Cannabigerol (CBG) – A synthetic version of CBG has demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties as well as promise in the treatment of autoimmunity, while CBG itself has shown promise in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.
  5. Cannabielsoin (CBE) – CBE is a metabolite of Cannabidiol. As of yet, there are no described pharmacological uses for CBE.
  6. Cannabividerin (CBV) – CBV has shown significant properties in 3 models of epilepsy, independent of the CB1 receptor.
  7. Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) – The activity of THCV is novel in that it acts to simultaneously block the CB1 receptor and activate the CB2 receptor, which may have important implications in the treatment of liver disease and inflammatory-associated obesity.

There is significant potential for exploitation of the various cannabinoids based on differences in potency and efficacy. Uncertainty has no place in medical marijuana recommendation, and tools like PotBotics will inevitably streamline and elevate the medical cannabis selection and recommendation process to new industry standards.

 

Marijuana & Spirituality: What Is The True Relationship? | Collective

The question of what role cannabis plays in my spiritual experience has been a topic of great evaluation in my life in recent years. The plant has played an interesting role in my journey of self-discovery, aiding me in times of emotional hardship as well as being a catalyst for some of my more profound observations about reality and my own existence therein.

I believe that all plants are teachers, they hold within them a primordial wisdom without the limitations of the mind, and through the use of these various plant teachers we are able to expand our normally restricted ways of thinking. But as much as we can learn from cannabis, can this plant be just as much of a distraction from the truth? There are a few things to consider, one of these being someone’s vibratory state, and the other being their intent.

Cannabis has been used as a spiritual drug since 3/2000 BC, indigenous to ancient Central and South Asian cultures. The reason being was for its psychoactive properties, the ability to alter one’s state of consciousness. By altering one’s state of consciousness, we are able to view our reality from a different perspective, one that differs from the normal confines of the 3D reality. For thousands of years, Shamans held the knowledge that each plant contains a unique set of frequencies that could ultimately teach us a new way of thinking and being. Accordingly, cannabis can teach us about a number of things such as the path of least resistance, oneness, surrender, release, letting go, inhibition, the present moment, communion, allowing, the fear behind the insistent ego, and the effortlessness of being.

Teal Scott is a bright up and coming spiritual advisor, offering free tips and guidance through her website (www.askteal.com) and her YouTube channel (The Spiritual Catalyst). She covered the topic of marijuana and spirituality quite eloquently, and so I’m using her video as inspiration for this discussion.  She begins by explaining people’s altering reactions to the plant,

“People react differently to cannabis, that’s because people hold different vibrations and vibratory rates, when a person with their unique vibratory rate shares the space with a cannabis plant, the person’s vibration has to match the vibration of the cannabis plant, otherwise they cannot share the same space”.

In shamanic tradition, plants were thought of as gateways or portals between realms or dimensions, and the vibratory relationship between the person and the plant was called friending. We friend the plant so the plant can allow us to pass between realms. Cannabis inhibits the brain from functioning at a normal capacity, which provides a great deal of relief for many people who are bombarded by their own resistant thoughts.  The brain is a transceiver of information designed to keep the illusion of a static three dimensional world.  When the brain is inhibited by a substance it begins to dismantle the 3D reality it is used to transcoding, and a person is able to see beyond their normal dimensional realities. Furthermore, Teal goes on the explain, cannabis sometimes allows a person the most of his/her own true being to be fully present or unrestricted.

So why is it that people react differently? Teal claims there are two reasons. The first being that someone’s vibration may be higher or lower than the plant. If someone with a lower vibration than cannabis uses the plant, it is likely they will feel better because the plant raises their vibration. Conversely, if someone with a higher vibration ingests or smokes the plant, they will most likely feel worse, experiencing feelings of paranoia or sadness.  The second reason involves intent.

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Cannabis enhances the truth of the universe, which is intention directs energy and creates your reality. If you do not set an intention before you use cannabis, then it is going to respond to the intention of your subconscious. For example, if your subconscious fears the loss of boundaries, or wishes for you to know something that is buried in the subconscious, then the ingestion or inhalation of cannabis will surface these subconscious fears and emotions. This is why many experience the paranoia associated with cannabis use.

One of the main benefits of cannabis use for most people is that it helps to release resistance. It is perhaps the best spiritual drug to help with this challenge. It forces the mind to let go of thoughts, which induces a stress reaction for the body. This is why it is the best release of stress for people with anxiety or pain, as pain is a form of resistance. It forces a person to go with the flow, and allows more of their true being to be present, hence why people experience such profound spiritual experiences while using cannabis.

The situation gets sticky when advocating for the use or non-use of cannabis. This area is grey because it is an individual case for every person. What can be said, however, is that when cannabis is used without intent, and a person  uses the plant on a regular basis to escape resistance, then there is likely no more personal lessons or growth proceeding. In this case, a person can be addicted to the escape, and is ultimately holding themselves back with regards to their personal development and spiritual expansion. They become unable to reach the organic space of non-resistance without the use of the substance.

Although not always defined as, marijuana is an addictive substance, whether habitually, psychologically, or physically, it is an easy escape route if used in that manner. Addictive means that we are dependent on a substance to produce a feeling state. Ultimately, we have the ability to reach these states without the help of tools, even though these tools can yield many benefits if used respectfully.

It’s important to remember that stress and resistance are what make us grow the most. Denying these two feelings is cutting your expansion short. If resistance is creeping up, then there is always something that needs to be addressed or looked at. Covering up these sorts of things with cannabis can be bypassing the root of the issue, therefore preventing you from fully learning.

That being said, there are many cases in which cannabis use can be beneficial. Besides the potent health benefits associated with the ingestion of cannabis concentrations, if someone is caught in a mind pattern of negative, anxious, depressive, or angry thoughts, then the use of cannabis can help break these patterns. If someone is in pain or is nauseous from a debilitating illness, cannabis can strongly aid in masking these types of agonies by eliminating resistance. In these cases the person’s vibratory rate is so low that cannabis picks them back up into realignment.

All in all, cannabis should never be a long term plan in treating resistance. If we want to be expanding at our highest capacity then we need to be looking at the root of our resistances so that we can continue to move forward. Being conscious about our decisions with any mind altering substance is the most important thing we can do. However, psychoactive plants and substances are tools that were put here in our world for a definitive reason. These plants are teachers. With the proper intention put forward, cannabis and other psychoactive plants have the ability to expand our consciousness in ways never thought possible.

Source:

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheSpiritualCatalyst

'Uber for Pot' Delivers Medical Marijuana in Under 10

Whatever your reason for not wanting to leave the house in order to purchase marijuana, a new delivery app may be your saving grace. Launched this summer, a San Francisco start-up dubbed the “Uber for Pot” has drivers cruising the city and looking to ease the pain of scoring weed.

The Eaze app uses a location-based service to connect buyers with Eaze drivers in the area, each carrying a variety of the same strains as furnished by dispensaries. As the San Francisco Chronicle‘s marijuana blog “Smell the Truth” reported, users can verify their prescribed patient status on the Eaze website, access the service via the site or the smartphone app to select a strain and quantity, and simply click “Request Delivery.”

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“When I told my parents about my idea for Eaze, they accused me of becoming a glorified drug dealer,” founder Keith McCarty told TechCrunch. The Yammer sales director explained that the app aims to bring convenience to medical marijuana patients, many of whom may be suffering from limited mobility. He was also motivated to start the company, he added, because of a marijuana strain called “Charlotte’s Web,” used to treat epilepsy in children. He continues,

Medical marijuana can be used to treat health conditions. These are real people with real medical conditions that need this medicine, and it has been really exciting and gratifying to talk with them, and know that we’re doing something to help.

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According to in-house tests, the company claims an average delivery time of 6 minutes (its goal being to always reach a patient’s door within 10), and the start-up has already partnered with SPARC, one of San Francisco’s biggest dispensaries, in order to provide a variety of high-quality goods. Delivering SPARC and other strains to its customers at in-store rates, Eaze currently makes its money similarly to food delivery-middleman GrubHub, as partnered dispensaries pay the company for its representation and delivery services.

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Drivers themselves can only accept cash due to federal regulations, and will make $10 per delivery. The unmarked cars will contain kits with pre-packaged, labeled 1/8-oz. bags, enough for 64 deliveries; “this means they can get to patients in an average time of 10 minutes,” McCarty tells the San Francisco Chronicle. “That’s a compelling value proposition [...] We’re offering the revolution of on-demand services for medical marijuana patients.”

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With $1.5 million squared away in first-round funding, the company is hoping to expand its service to other California cities and, eventually, other states where medical marijuana is legal. The funding was provided by 40 Silicon Valley-based angel and institutional investors, many of which participated in a syndicate launched by Fresh VC on crowd-funding site AngelList, the Wall Street Journal reports. Within two weeks of its July launch, Eaze was providing over 500 customers with marijuana deliveries, the publication added.

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The app may soon be in active competition with a wave of similar products, such as LA’s NestDrop, Canary (soon to launch in Seattle and include options for delivered “munchies”), and Meadow, a fee-based delivery service. Curious parties not yet ready to take the delivery plunge can also use a number of weed-based websites to investigate their local options; one such site is Weedmaps, described by Gizmodo as the “Yelp” of the marijuana community. Given a patient’s location, the website will generate a list of marijuana-prescribing doctors, dispensaries, delivery companies, and other pot-related services within a 20-mile radius, as well as contact info and reviews.

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Consumers can currently test-drive Eaze’s delivery app (and one of SPARC’s strains) for free: each new customer is entitled to a free 1/8-oz. bag of marijuana, and, for a limited time, can also reefer a friend during Eaze’s “Buds for Buds!” promotion for a $10 account credit.

Eaze, Getty

DC, Oregon, and Alaska Just Voted to Legalize Marijuana | Mother

Oregon and Alaska are renowned for their pot-smoking libertarians, hippies, and hipsters, but they’re no match for the blazer-and-khaki-clad stoners in the nation’s capital. That’s right. DC’s marijuana legalization measure, Initiative 71, which was predicted to sail through by a 2-1 margin, has officially passed by an even larger margin. Okay, not officially passed, but, you know, the big media guys called it and…and…what was I writing about again?

Oh, yeah. So, pot easily passes in DC and, by a smaller margin in Oregon, and by just two points in Alaska. How to explain this, other than Sen. Mitch McConnell’s well-known addiction to Grand Daddy Purp?

If the DC vote caught you by surprise, then consider our capital’s long, intimate relationship with the cannabis plant. The Declaration of Independence was written on hemp paper. George Washington urged his gardener to “make the most” of Indian hemp seed, which, translated into modern English, obviously means cooking it into hash oil and smoking dabs from an oil rig. (If you don’t know what I’m talking about then you clearly don’t live in DC.) The point is, DC was cool before Portland even fucking existed.

When I was in college in the late 1990s, I visited DC, where I bought some low-grade pot from some young black dude on the street. Such purchases happen all the time in DC, and when things go wrong, it’s usually the young dealer, not the stoned college kid, who winds up in jail. The disparities are well known within the District’s African American community: Blacks make up about half of the DC population but accounted for 90 percent of its arrests for drug possession, according to a study last year. And while, according to the Washington Post, African Americans in the District once tended to oppose legalization for fear it could lead to more young blacks getting addicted, they now support it as the same rate as whites do.

The most obvious reason that DC suits could get legal pot is that there’s no rural DC—unless you count the cherry trees around the Washington Monument, which I don’t. However, this map shows the vast swath of Oregon hinterlands that backed Mitt Romney in 2012. That tiny blue sliver resembling the Gaza Strip is Portland.

But pro-pot voters in DC still face an uphill battle. While Washington is the most liberal place in America after San Francisco, (so says The Economist), it is also home to Congress, a slightly less progressive institution, which happens to control the District’s purse strings and has 30 days to review and nullify any new DC law. Republican Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland, pictured above (he’s the guy without the tea), has pledged to “blunt” the DC pot rule, as Politico aptly put it. Getting the rest of Congress to follow suit might get a lot easier if, as some pro-pot campaigners fear, thousands of ecstatic stoners spark up on the streets tonight.

These legalization measures weren’t the only marijuana initiatives on the ballot Tuesday. Florida was supposed to be the first state in the South to legalize medical marijuana, but support for the measure took a nosedive, and it has lost by a fairly big margin. (Slate‘s Michael Ames blames “dysfunctional partisanship.”) There are also local measures on the ballot in several states. And for what it’s worth, a medical-marijuana referendum passed today by a 12-point margin in Guam, which is certain to give a boost to this song: