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Report: Facebook is deleting medical marijuana pages

New Jersey law strictly regulates what information can and cannot be displayed on a dispensary’s website, which has led many of the organizations to use Facebook as a supplemental information source. Strain names, for example, cannot be listed on a New Jersey-based dispensary website. The move has left many patients that rely on these Facebook pages angry. “It seems high-handed to simply shut down important resources for sick patients without even saying why or giving organizations a way to ask for reconsideration,” Peter Rosenfeld, a NJ medical marijuana patient told NJ.com.

When asked for comment, a Facebook spokesperson told Engadget, “These pages have been removed for violating our Community Standards, which outline what is and is not allowed on Facebook. Here is a link to our standards.” However, the community standards appear to only “prohibit attempts by unauthorized dealers to purchase, sell, or trade prescription drugs, marijuana, or firearms.” Given that these organizations are legal within the states that they operate, they don’t technically meet that standard. However, going by federal law they would.

11 States Least Likely to Legalize Marijuana

Illegal in the United States for nearly 80 years, marijuana accounted for 8.2 million arrests nationwide between 2001 and 2010. Despite the decades old federal ban, the country’s attitude toward marijuana has been changing. While only 12% of Americans supported legalizing pot in 1969, 58% of Americans supported an end to marijuana prohibition in 2013.

Starting with California in 1996, medicinal marijuana use is now legal in 23 states. Of the states with laws protecting medicinal users, four have legalized recreational pot use as well. Despite evolving opinions among voters and legislators, some states still seem unlikely to pass any kind of meaningful reform in the near future. Based on a review of marijuana laws and penalties for possession, 24/7 Wall St. identified the 11 least likely states to legalize marijuana.

In all of the states least likely to legalize pot, possession is a felony under certain circumstances. Perhaps due to strict penalties, estimated usage rates are below average in these states. While an estimated 12.3% of Americans age 12 years and older smoke marijuana, usage rates in all of the states least likely to legalize pot are below the national rate. In Kansas, for example, one of the least pot friendly states in the country, only 8.2% of residents 12 years and older use marijuana, the smallest share of any state in the country.

Click here to see the 11 states least likely to legalize marijuana.

Click here to see the next 11 states to legalize marijuana.

According to Mason Tvert, director of communications with the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), legal repercussions are not the only factor explaining the relatively low marijuana usage in these states. “There is little doubt marijuana prohibition laws are deterring many adults from choosing to use marijuana,” Tvert said. However, a range of cultural factors, from historical immigration patterns to how religious a population is, also come into play, he noted.

All of the states least likely to legalize pot tend towards the conservative end of the political spectrum. In the 2012 presidential election, all of the states on this list voted for the conservative candidate. Tvert explained that each state’s history feeds into and partially explains its current culture and attitude. For example, though federal alcohol prohibition ended in 1933 with the 21st amendment, Oklahoma did not repeal prohibition laws until 1959, more than a quarter of a century later. Since marijuana has been illegal for the entirety of most people’s lives, “it makes them hesitant to make significant changes to marijuana policies,” Tvert said.

Legislative committee approves bill to allow industrial hemp | Hub

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PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — A legislative committee has approved a bill that would open the door to the cultivation of industrial hemp in South Dakota.

The House Agriculture and Natural Resources committee voted 11-2 to approve the plan Tuesday.

It heads to the full House of Representatives for consideration.

Republican Rep. Mike Verchio is the bill’s main House sponsor. He says hemp could “transform the rural economics” of South Dakota if used to its full potential.

The South Dakota bill restricts the content of THC for industrial hemp. It would allow people to apply to the state Department of Agriculture for a license to grow the plant.

Republican Rep. Scott Craig opposed the bill. Craig says he’s concerned that allowing industrial hemp cultivation is part of the pro-drug lobby’s efforts to eventually legalize marijuana.

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Mary's Medicinals Introduces Cannabinoid-Infused Green & Protein

MM Logo1Mary’s Medicinals announces the availability of its Good Greens and Whey Protein Cannabinoid-Infused Powder Drink Mixes in Colorado.

“As more people begin to understand the health and wellness benefits of cannabis, there is growing demand for easier ways to consume the beneficial components of the plant,” said Nicole Smith, founder CEO, Mary’s Medicinals. “Many patients are finding amazing results from juicing raw cannabis leaves. However, most of us aren’t fortunate enough to have regular access to substantial quantities of live plants. Our new approach will make it much easier for anyone to conveniently consume their cannabinoids, ‘daily greens’ and protein.”

Mary’s researchers have refined a new process of encapsulating and preserving fresh plant material.  The method retains the nutritional value of the plant, and its active cannabinoids remain intact and shelf stable. The encapsulated cannabinoid powder is blended with the highest quality greens mix or whey protein, along with hemp flour, and a rich assortment of plant-based nutrients. The result is a product that can be stored for extended periods while retaining the benefits of fresh cannabis.

“We’re always looking at ways to address the poor bioavailability of cannabinoids whenMaryHeals ingested—so we took a pharmaceutical approach and encapsulated these cannabinoids in a water soluble matrix that increases bioavailability—and therefore efficacy,” said Noel Palmer Ph.D., Chief Scientist, Mary’s Medicinals.

Product Details:

  • Mary’s Good Greens Powder Drink Mix is a blend of fruits, vegetables and other plant nutrients combined with a 1:1 ratio of THCa and CBDa. Good Greens provides vitamins, minerals and antioxidants which may improve immune and digestive health, increase energy, aid in the treatment and prevention of cancer, and promote heart health.
  • Mary’s Whey Protein Powder Drink Mix is a workout recovery blend infused with 160mg CBDa. The anti-inflammatory effects of CBDa coupled with high quality whey protein are ideal for rapid recovery after intense workouts.
  • Each container includes 160mg of active cannabinoids in 16oz of powder. Both Powder Mixes are also available in convenient, single serve portions.
  • CBDa, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid and a precursor to CBD, is reported to have anti-emetic effects as well as anti-proliferative effects. It also has been shown to be an anti-inflammatory and to possess strong anti-bacterial properties.
  • THCa, another non-psychotropic cannabinoid, is reported to have anti-proliferative, anti-epileptic and anti-inflammatory abilities. Patients have reported that THCa can aid neuropathy, arthritis, endometriosis and menstrual cramps. Many report energizing effects from its use.

Mary’s also offers high bioavailability transdermal patches, gels and topical compounds, as well as 100 percent plant-based, vegan, GMO-free, gluten-free capsules. Learn more about Mary’s products at www.marysmedicinals.com.

mary's nutrMary’s Nutritionals, a sister company of Mary’s Medicinals, offers a complementary line of high quality CBD products which are available without restriction to customers nationwide. Look out for availability of Mary’s Powders and other new products on marysnutritionals.com over the coming months.

 

 

About Mary’s Medicinals:
Mary’s Medicinals is a wellness company innovating at the intersection of engineering and horticulture. Mary’s is focused on transforming how people view and utilize cannabis, developing products that isolate the benefits of cannabis and other vital plant extracts for optimum patient care. More information is available at: www.marysmedicinals.com.

The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficiency of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from health care practitioners. If you are taking any medication or are under treatment for any disease, please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using these products. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.

*This is a paid advertisement

The Stoned Immaculate: Meet the Weed Nuns of the San Joaquin

Photo via Sisters of the Valley on Instagram

Last October, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act into law, requiring local jurisdictions to develop their own marijuana regulations by March 1, 2016, or relinquish authority to the state government. As a result, as many as 19 cities around the state have scrambled to ban medical cannabis dispensaries before the deadline, and more are considering enacting bans or restrictions of their own.

One of those cities is Merced, located in Northern California’s San Joaquin Valley, where local lawmakers voted Tuesday to impose a moratorium on the cultivation of medical marijuana until the city figures out exactly what to do about the issue.

In the lead up to city council vote, the most visible opponents of the ban were the Sisters of the Valley, a pair of self-described New Age nuns who grow medical marijuana in the garage of Sister Kate, the elder nun and the founder of the group. The Sisters concentrate on growing cannabis strains that are rich in CBD, a non-psychoactive element of marijuana, and sell medicinal salves, tinctures, and other goods via Etsy.

Although the Sisters of the Valley wear habits, they aren’t nuns in the traditional sense. Sister Kate, and her partner Sister Darcy, don’t follow any sort of organized religion, but rather see themselves as a spiritual sisterhood devoted to medical marijuana. VICE spoke to Sister Kate about the Sisters fight against the new ban, and their commitment to making marijuana medicine by the moon cycles.

VICE: Who exactly are the Sisters of the Valley? What do you guys stand for?Sister Kate: When you’re a sister, you represent order, cleanliness, efficiency, honesty. I thought, “What could I form that is self-sustaining, that could be a sisterhood, that would weave in spirituality, that would weave in Mother Earth?” and sort of came up with Sisters of the Valley. We want to be self-empowered, female-run, and female-owned.

Why wear a habit?
We chose that uniform because people can identify with it very quickly. We never hide the fact that we’re not Catholic nuns; we’re a New Age sisterhood. We try to operate based on what our ancient mothers would do. We make our medicine new moon to full moon, and we work everyday in our habits, and those are the days we do prayer ceremonies and focus on the medicine. As soon as we’re through a full moon, we’re in a relaxation state for two weeks. It’s during that time that we are more relaxed and more likely to be out and about [not wearing habits].

No one who works with us, or for us, has to put on the habit, unless they feel like they want to. We do make vows, but our obedience is to the cycles of the earth and to the plants.

Are you worried about being shut down?
[The Merced City Council] could shut me down. But I’ve already made it clear to all of them that they’re going to have to shut me down.

Sister Kate during the harvest. Photo via the Sisters on Instagram

As a self-identified “nun,” how would you describe your spirituality?
I think there are many, many women who are missing the concept of a sort of sisterhood, a supporting sisterhood. I would never, ever say that we are aspiring or trying to be like the Catholic nuns, because we’re not. We’re trying to do something that’s more activist-based, that’s more planet-based, Mother Earth-friendly. What we are very, very strict about is being vegan during our medicine-making moon cycles. There are two weeks out of the month where we are strictly vegan because that actually does something for Mother Earth. That to me is putting an olive branch to the old concept of sisterhood. We want to be empowered [women], something that will teach a culture of activism for change.

Can you explain how harvesting medical cannabis is a spiritual practice for the Sisters?
The cannabis culture, stoner culture, is kind of offensive to those of us who have held a pipe up to a shaking Parkinson’s patient, and seen how [with] one hit out of the pipe, his shakes can go away, and he can actually get up and make tea and act like a normal person. So the spirituality for me, personally, it was a convenient way to develop a work ethic in my business. It’s a mode of work that demands excellence, that demands high quality, and demands intention and purpose. It nourishes me to have that in my daily life. But it does something bigger. As long as we are the honorable women and wear the garb honorably, then we are a counterbalance to the stoner culture.

How central is cannabis to that spirituality?
Our culture of sisterhood isn’t just about the cannabis plant. Spirituality is about following ancient wisdom, planting by moon cycles, and harvesting by moon cycles, and participating in what is nourishing to the soul. We are trying to create a lifestyle that has us putting our hands in Mother Dirt in the early part of the day, and maybe doing office work later where there’s some spirituality booked into the schedule.

We don’t pray to the cannabis plant; I laughed when someone suggested that we were honoring the cannabis plant. No, we’re putting our own inherently divine healing energies into the growing and producing of medicine that our ancient mothers did.

Follow Madeleine on Twitter.

US veteran's children taken away over his use of medical marijuana

When Raymond Schwab talks about his case, his voice teeters between anger and sadness.

“People who don’t understand the medical value of cannabis are tearing my family apart,” says the Kansas father and US veteran, who has a prescription for marijuana in neighboring Colorado, where it is legal.

Nine months ago, Schwab tried to move to Colorado to grow medical marijuana for fellow veterans. While he and his wife were there preparing for the move, the state of Kansas took five of their children, ages 5 to 16, into custody on suspicion of child endangerment, ensnaring his family in interstate marijuana politics.

Cases like the Schwabs’ have become a lightning rod for marijuana activists and have left courts, family attorneys and Child Protective Services (CPS) unsure of where the lines are drawn in this brave new world of legalized cannabis.

“There’s still a stigma against parents who use medical marijuana,” says Jennifer Ani, a family law attorney who says she sees around five similar cases a month – in 95% of which she believes the child was in no reasonable danger. “As much as marijuana is a moving target throughout the nation, with Child Protective Services it’s even more so.”

She says that concerns about contact-highs or children eating raw cannabis are often cited but are not scientifically sound arguments that a child is in danger. Contact-highs have been widely discredited as a myth, and cannabis must be cooked before it can get you high.

The US Department of Health and Human Services declined to comment on the Schwab case but pointed us to their guide “Parental Drug Use As Child Abuse”, which says that “exposing children to the manufacture, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs is considered child endangerment in 11 States [including Kansas]” and “the Federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act requires states to have policies and procedures in place to notify child protective services agencies of substance-exposed newborns”.

A case like Schwab’s has one foot in both the legal and illegal dynamics of marijuana, since his case involves Kansas, where cannabis remains illegal, and Colorado, where it is legal for both medical and recreational sale.

Tensions have been running high between Colorado and neighboring states whose residents want to purchase cannabis. Last year, sheriffs from Nebraska, Oklahoma and Kansas filed a lawsuit against the state for its marijuana laws, citing trafficking concerns; and this month, the Kansas attorney general sent out 500 surveys to their county and district attorneys, sheriffs and chiefs of police asking how Colorado marijuana is affecting their work.

A US navy veteran who served in the Gulf war, Schwab says that he uses a homemade cannabis butter to treat his post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, and chronic pain. For years, he says, his mental health issues went undiagnosed, resulting in a bout of alcoholism and substance abuse. He was prescribed a variety of sedatives, antidepressants and chronic pain medication, which he says often made him feel worse. “I got addicted to the pain medication, which led to heroin addiction.”

Schwab says that he has been sober since a stint in rehab in 2011, and that cannabis is the only medication that helps with his anxiety, depression and physical pain.

Schwab arranged in early 2015 for his job at the Department of Veterans Affairs to be transferred from Kansas to Colorado, where he could legally grow his own cannabis and work with veterans who, like him, use the plant medicinally.

While dealing with the move, he and Amelia arranged for the five children to stay with relatives. (The four youngest children were born to Raymond and his wife, Amelia; the 16-year-old and a 19-year-old who was not taken into custody are Amelia’s children from previous relationships.) After driving 60 miles away from home, the Schwabs received a call saying they needed to appear in an emergency hearing that day because their children were in state custody.

Schwab says that one of the relatives caring for his children (whom he declines to name) took them to the police station, saying their parents had abandoned them to go work on a pot farm in Colorado. That was in April last year, and Schwab says he has only seen his children three times since then.

The communications director for the Kansas department of children and families (DCF) declined to comment on the Schwab case but said that “children are not removed from the home for [parental] marijuana use alone”.

Yet Schwab says that no investigation was done of him or his home, and that the only evidence against him was the testimony of the police officer that took the children into custody. There were allegations of “emotional abuse” but a DCF report in July found those to be “unsubstantiated”.

Included in the police report was a screenshot of Schwab’s recent Facebook post, where he discusses moving to Colorado to start a marijuana business. The Schwabs have been asked to submit a urine sample that would be tested to see if they have used marijuana before they can visit their children – despite having relocated to Colorado, where he has a prescription.

The district attorney of Riley County, Kansas, where the Schwabs’ case is currently being handled, did not return requests for an interview.

Ani says that it’s not unusual to see children removed from their home for marijuana use, even in states where it’s legal. In 2014 she defended a California couple whose children were taken by CPS after a police officer smelled marijuana in the house, despite having prescriptions for the substance. The additional charge against them was that their home was in disarray.

Last year, Ani worked on the highly publicized Kansas case of Shona Banda, whose 11-year-old son was taken from her after he told his drug education program teacher that his mother used cannabis.

For cases like Schwab’s, the legal spiderweb of cannabis law becomes compounded by his PTSD.

Dr Sue Sisley – a psychiatrist who recently received a $2m grant to study the effects of cannabis in treating PTSD, the first study of its kind – says that for vets like Schwab, “they need their medicine in order to be a good parent”.

“A lot of these vets, they can’t function without their meds. And they have to live in fear of a positive drug test, and losing their kids to Child Protective Services. So they live this crazy, covert lifestyle where they’re afraid to be open to the people around them, for fear that they’ll call CPS.”

Last month, Schwab testified before a Kansas state senate committee and, with tears in his eyes, pleaded for the state to “give me back my children”.

The committee was considering a bill that aimed to lower criminal penalties for marijuana possession and allow hemp oil to be used medicinally – moves that he criticized for not going far enough.

Schwab says that once he regains custody of his children he plans to sue the state of Kansas for violation of his constitutional rights. “They’re holding my kids hostage and threatening to terminate my rights if I don’t seek cannabis-abuse therapy in a state that’s legal. They’re threatening other people with jail time or losing their kids if they speak out, but I will not submit. I’ll take this to the supreme court if I have to.”

  • The article was amended on 1 February 2016 to clarify that the Schwabs have six children; the oldest is 19 years old.

Vermont Next State Likely to Legalize Marijuana

Vermont is likely the next state to legalize marijuana, based on a 24/7 Wall St. analysis of the industry. New information buttresses the argument.

According to The Next 11 States to Legalize Marijuana:

According to a Rand research study on marijuana legalization, Vermonters consumed between 15 to 25 metric tons of marijuana, worth between $125 million and $225 million, in 2014. More than 19% of state residents 12 years and over reported using marijuana in the past year, the third highest share nationwide. Also, according to the Vermont Department of Health, marijuana consumption is more common among 12- to 17-year-olds in Vermont than in any other state in the nation.

As in every other state likely to legalize pot, possessing less than an ounce or less of the drug is not punishable by incarceration. Possessing more than an ounce, the selling of any amount, or cultivating the plant, however, is considered a misdemeanor. Selling a half ounce or more, or cultivating three or more plants, is a felony.

Pot arrests equaled 148 people per 100,000. Marijuana-related arrests totaled 926 in 2012.


24/7 Wall St.
The Most Stressed Out City in Every State

Earlier this month, a committee of the Vermont Senate recommended that the state allow recreational use of marijuana without penalty. Vermont Gov. Peter Schumlin stated:

The war on drugs has failed when it comes to marijuana prohibition. … The question for us is how do we deal with that failure. Vermont can take a smarter approach that regulates marijuana in a thoughtful way, and this bill provides a framework for us to do that.

The legal use of marijuana could be just a month or two away.

Methodology: To identify the next states to legalize marijuana, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed states where possession of small amounts of marijuana is not punishable by jail and also where medical marijuana is currently legal based on data from the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP). We also considered marijuana-related arrests per 100,000 residents through 2012 provided by the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report. In addition, we considered the estimated proportion of residents 12 and older who had used marijuana sometime in the past year, based on annualized data from 2012 and 2013, from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Public opinion polls were provided by the Marijuana Policy Project based on the most recent available survey. All data on current enforcement policies and penalties were provided by NORML.

Lawmakers introduce bill to expand industrial hemp operations

University of Hawaii hemp research station in Waimanalo
University of Hawaii hemp research station in Waimanalo

Lawmakers introduced a bill Tuesday to expand industrial hemp operations in Hawaii.

The measure, HB2555, supports a public-private partnership to consider the benefits of industrial hemp to our state’s economy.

The measure has been cosigned by over 30 members in the House of Representatives.

A similar industrial hemp measure, SB2659, was introduced last week on the Senate side by Sen. Mike Gabbard.

As of now, there is only one plot of industrial hemp that’s allowed to be grown in Hawaii, and that’s the University of Hawaii’s research project in Waimanalo.

But this bill would allow anyone to apply for a permit to research, grow and sell hemp in Hawaii.

“It’s for industrial use, like clothes and rope,” said Rep. Kaniela Ing (D/Kihei, Wailea, Makena). “The Declaration of Independence was written on hemp paper, but somehow we just veered so far from it. The crop itself can restore the nutrients to the soil that it’s on.

“There is a huge groundswell of support from the general public and members of the agriculture sector to legalize industrial hemp,” he said. “While hemp is not a magic bullet for Hawaii’s struggling agriculture industry, it does deserve our consideration, especially with the closing of sugar operations by HCS.”

Rep. Cynthia Thielen (R/Kailua, Kaneohe Bay) — a longtime supporter of legalizing industrial hemp — said “hemp is often grown without pesticides or herbicides due to its natural ability to ward off unwanted insects and weeds. Furthermore, hemp’s potential as a biofuel feedstock could be a game-changer for Hawaii.

“There are over 25,000 different uses for hemp, and in the U.S. alone, the market for hemp seed oil and fiber is approximately $600 million a year,” she said.

According to scientists, hemp is similar to marijuana, but does not have enough of the active ingredient THC to get people high.

Human Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics | Mary Janes World

The Stoned Immaculate: Meet the Weed Nuns of the San Joaquin

Photo via Sisters of the Valley on Instagram

Last October, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act into law, requiring local jurisdictions to develop their own marijuana regulations by March 1, 2016, or relinquish authority to the state government. As a result, as many as 19 cities around the state have scrambled to ban medical cannabis dispensaries before the deadline, and more are considering enacting bans or restrictions of their own.

One of those cities is Merced, located in Northern California’s San Joaquin Valley, where local lawmakers voted Tuesday to impose a moratorium on the cultivation of medical marijuana until the city figures out exactly what to do about the issue.

In the lead up to city council vote, the most visible opponents of the ban were the Sisters of the Valley, a pair of self-described New Age nuns who grow medical marijuana in the garage of Sister Kate, the elder nun and the founder of the group. The Sisters concentrate on growing cannabis strains that are rich in CBD, a non-psychoactive element of marijuana, and sell medicinal salves, tinctures, and other goods via Etsy.

Although the Sisters of the Valley wear habits, they aren’t nuns in the traditional sense. Sister Kate, and her partner Sister Darcy, don’t follow any sort of organized religion, but rather see themselves as a spiritual sisterhood devoted to medical marijuana. VICE spoke to Sister Kate about the Sisters fight against the new ban, and their commitment to making marijuana medicine by the moon cycles.

VICE: Who exactly are the Sisters of the Valley? What do you guys stand for?Sister Kate: When you’re a sister, you represent order, cleanliness, efficiency, honesty. I thought, “What could I form that is self-sustaining, that could be a sisterhood, that would weave in spirituality, that would weave in Mother Earth?” and sort of came up with Sisters of the Valley. We want to be self-empowered, female-run, and female-owned.

Why wear a habit?
We chose that uniform because people can identify with it very quickly. We never hide the fact that we’re not Catholic nuns; we’re a New Age sisterhood. We try to operate based on what our ancient mothers would do. We make our medicine new moon to full moon, and we work everyday in our habits, and those are the days we do prayer ceremonies and focus on the medicine. As soon as we’re through a full moon, we’re in a relaxation state for two weeks. It’s during that time that we are more relaxed and more likely to be out and about [not wearing habits].

No one who works with us, or for us, has to put on the habit, unless they feel like they want to. We do make vows, but our obedience is to the cycles of the earth and to the plants.

Are you worried about being shut down?
[The Merced City Council] could shut me down. But I’ve already made it clear to all of them that they’re going to have to shut me down.

Sister Kate during the harvest. Photo via the Sisters on Instagram

As a self-identified “nun,” how would you describe your spirituality?
I think there are many, many women who are missing the concept of a sort of sisterhood, a supporting sisterhood. I would never, ever say that we are aspiring or trying to be like the Catholic nuns, because we’re not. We’re trying to do something that’s more activist-based, that’s more planet-based, Mother Earth-friendly. What we are very, very strict about is being vegan during our medicine-making moon cycles. There are two weeks out of the month where we are strictly vegan because that actually does something for Mother Earth. That to me is putting an olive branch to the old concept of sisterhood. We want to be empowered [women], something that will teach a culture of activism for change.

Can you explain how harvesting medical cannabis is a spiritual practice for the Sisters?
The cannabis culture, stoner culture, is kind of offensive to those of us who have held a pipe up to a shaking Parkinson’s patient, and seen how [with] one hit out of the pipe, his shakes can go away, and he can actually get up and make tea and act like a normal person. So the spirituality for me, personally, it was a convenient way to develop a work ethic in my business. It’s a mode of work that demands excellence, that demands high quality, and demands intention and purpose. It nourishes me to have that in my daily life. But it does something bigger. As long as we are the honorable women and wear the garb honorably, then we are a counterbalance to the stoner culture.

How central is cannabis to that spirituality?
Our culture of sisterhood isn’t just about the cannabis plant. Spirituality is about following ancient wisdom, planting by moon cycles, and harvesting by moon cycles, and participating in what is nourishing to the soul. We are trying to create a lifestyle that has us putting our hands in Mother Dirt in the early part of the day, and maybe doing office work later where there’s some spirituality booked into the schedule.

We don’t pray to the cannabis plant; I laughed when someone suggested that we were honoring the cannabis plant. No, we’re putting our own inherently divine healing energies into the growing and producing of medicine that our ancient mothers did.

Follow Madeleine on Twitter.