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Support for industrial hemp grows among Pennsylvania farmers

After more than a 40 year absence, the growth of industrial hemp may be coming back to Pennsylvania as lawmakers and farmers push the General Assembly to allow for cultivation of the agricultural product.

Bills have been introduced in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and Senate to set up a pilot program to research for the cultivation of industrial hemp. The growth of industrial hemp has been banned in the United States since 1970 due to its relation to marijuana.

Before it was banned, Pennsylvania had a long history of growing hemp around the state. Now, the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau has come out in support of growing the product once again.

John Bell, with the farm bureau, said in a prepared release that the production of hemp shows promise as a viable commodity for Pennsylvania farms.

“If the state intends to implement a worthwhile program of hemp research,” Bell said “it must develop a definitive plan that coordinates and prioritizes funding for research activities, so it is prepared to respond to challenges faced by those who grow and market hemp products.”

The sponsor of the House bill, Rep. Russ Diamond, R-Lebanon, said last year’s federal farm bill allowed states to set up programs for cultivating industrial hemp — which is used for paper, rope, textiles, food, fuel and other things. More than 20 states have begun researching growing industrial hemp.

Currently, the United States imports $650 million worth of hemp — mostly from China.

“We might as well grow it here and let our farmers benefit,” Diamond said. “I certainly want to do something to help Pennsylvania’s farmers. Give them another crop to cultivate and make some money off of.”

There are a lot of misconceptions about industrial hemp that keeps people from supporting these two bill, Diamond said. Many people think hemp is closely chemically related to marijuana, but there’s big differences.

Hemp, a member of the cannabis species, contains very low levels of tetrahydrocannabinol, the substance that leads to the high smokers feel from marijuana. 

“You’d have to smoke a cigarette the size of a telephone pole of industrial hemp [to get high],” Diamond said. “And by then you’d probably be sick anyway.”

The farm bureau said it does have some concerns about the legal consequences that Pennsylvania farmers others producing and marketing hemp may face in the wake of federal drug laws that continue to treat all cannabis plants, including hemp plants, as illegal substances.

The farm bill provision exempts growers from prosecution under the Controlled Substances Act

“The farm bill exception is very limited, and doesn’t guarantee every person engaging in hemp production or marketing will be fully protected from criminal federal drug enforcement and seizures of land and property as contraband,” Bell said.

“In moving forward, the commonwealth and the General Assembly must be vigilant in protecting people, who are acting in good faith and legally involved in hemp production and marketing in Pennsylvania, from extreme federal enforcement action.”

Article > GW kicks off PhIII trial of cannabinoid in rare epilepsy

GW Pharmaceuticals has kicked off a Phase III clinical trial of its cannabinoid Epidiolex for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a rare and severe form of childhood-onset epilepsy.

 

Although there are approved treatments available for patients with LGS, “this severe form of epilepsy often remains particularly difficult to treat,” says Justin Gover, GW’s chief executive, adding “we believe that Epidiolex has the potential to meet this significant unmet need”.

 

GW anticipates that top-line data from the 14-week, 150-patient trial, which closely follows the start of two late-stage studies assessing the drug in another rare childhood epilepsy called Dravet syndrome, will be available early next year.

 

Around 14,000-18,500 patients are estimated to suffer from LGS in the US, and 23,000-31,000 in Europe.

Marijuana Proven To Kill Cancer In Eye Opening Documentary

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Marijuana Proven To Kill Cancer In Eye Opening Documentary in5d

The most fascinating area of cannabis research revolves around an element of the marijuana plant called Cannabidiol , (CBD) a powerful antioxidant that does not produce the psychotropic effects of THC. CBD shows a unique ability to kill cancer cells in early laboratory tests.

In 2003, the United States government filed a patent on CBD as an antioxidant and neuroprotectant useful in the treatment of disease. Yet this same government continues to classify marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug with “no currently accepted medical use,” preventing doctors from studying it.

The government’s hypocritical position on CBD leaves patients like Sophie in uncharted waters, as they experimentally use an unregulated medicine that may be saving their lives.

Watch the extended trailer for this documentary below:

A MUST READ: The Marijuana Conspiracy

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State Lawmaker: No Vote on Medical Marijuana | WNEP.com

WEST BURLINGTON TOWNSHIP — A lawmaker from our area says he won’t let a bill to legalize medical marijuana come up for a vote in an important house committee. That’s after the bill that would legalize it sailed through the state senate last week.

It’s the May primary and the polls are open to voters in the 64th Legislative District west of Towanda. There’s no race for state representative this time around, but Republican Matt Baker is at the center of the debate over whether to legalize medical marijuana in Pennsylvania. We talked with him last month in Harrisburg.

“The lion share of the medical community and medical associations are not recommending legalization of marijuana for medical purposes,” Rep. Matt Baker, (R) 64th District said last month.

Even though 40 out of 47 state senators voted this month for that medical marijuana bill, state Rep. Matt Baker who heads up the health committee, says at this point, the bill will not come up for a vote in that committee for the foreseeable future.

“If Pennsylvanians support it, I don’t think it’s a good thing it doesn’t come up for a vote because then it’s already denied,” said Troy resident Mary Dunbar.

According to a recent poll by Quinnipiac University, nearly 90 percent of people in Pennsylvania support the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes.

In a Newswatch 16 special report earlier this month, we told you about the more than $20,000 in campaign contributions Baker received from pharmaceutical companies and political action committees last year.

Some voters in his district do not believe that money is swaying his decision.

“I feel Matt is an honest and sincere man, and is going along with his constituents, not for his own self gain,” said Henry Stone of Canton.

Still others wonder if Baker is acting in the best interest of the voters or the companies that have competing drugs already on the market.

“It would be questionable since the senators had such a majority in agreement. I would certainly be concerned there’s something going on,” said June Atherton of Burlington.

If Rep. Baker, as the chair of the house health committee, doesn’t allow the medical marijuana bill to come up for a vote, lawmakers say there are other ways to get it to the full house floor for a vote.

7 States Ready To Legalize Marijuana

Source: Mark Piscotty/Getty Images

Source: Mark Piscotty/Getty Images

2012 and 2014 were both incredibly important years for marijuana legalization. Colorado and Washington both jumped the gun and passed initiatives to decriminalize and legalize cannabis by popular vote in 2012, and since then, have both opened the first legal marijuana markets in the U.S. Legal retail sales began this year, and so far things have settled into place, albeit slowly.

The 2014 midterms saw legalization sweep over more areas of the country, including Oregon, Alaska and Washington D.C. For now, it looks as if the west coast is epicenter of the movement, but that may change in 2016.

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Many states are following Washington and Colorado’s path, getting closer and closer to legalization every election cycle. So far, legalization advocates have had to rely on voter-backed initiatives to get legislation passed, as the federal government seems as though it still won’t budge on reclassifying cannabis out of its current Schedule 1 status. Local governments across the country have taken baby steps towards ending prohibition, with many cities passing ordinances that either have decriminalized small amounts of marijuana or marked them as a lowest priority for law enforcement officials.

Many people are still struggling with the concept of legalized marijuana. For decades and generations, Americans grew accustomed to knowing marijuana as a powerful and dangerous drug — one that could lead to deaths and criminal behavior if it was allowed in their community. The past decade has really opened up a lot of people’s eyes to the facts, which almost wholly dismiss those worries. The medical marijuana communities in several states have also shown the immense benefits cannabis can have for the sick, which is one of many factors that have led to a seismic shift in public opinion regarding marijuana legalization.

Presently, we sit on the precipice of more states preparing for coming marijuana legalization initiatives, either derived from state legislators or from citizens themselves through the ballots. Colorado and Washington kicked-off the whole thing, and have since been joined by a few others. That doesn’t mean that a slew of other states aren’t on the cusp, however.

Here are seven states that are preparing for legalization pushes of their own, hot on the heels of Washington, Colorado, Oregon, Alaska and Washington D.C. Several of these states of ballot initiatives set for 2016, so we could less than two short years away from seeing their aspirations for marijuana legalization become a reality.

UH sets up industrial hemp research station | KHON2

Hawaii made hemp history Friday, joining only a handful of other states in the nation to do research on hemp, set in Waimanalo.

Lawmakers, farmers and University of Hawaii officials planted the first hemp seed at the UH Waimanalo Research Station. UH will study how industrialized hemp works as part of the 2014 farm bill, which legalizes industrial hemp production for research purposes.

“Both the stalk and the seeds are valuable products,” said UH professor Harry Ako, “so we want to find out how much water we need. We don’t want to import a plant that will just dry up our whole state of water.”

“Fuel, food and fiber is what we’ve always said,” Clarence Baber of the Hawaii Farmers Union United said. “The fuel is one aspect, fiber is housing, and food is a big thing for all of us.”

Congress still needs to legalize hemp for agricultural production. Supporters of hemp say the plant has more than 25,000 uses and assure that it’s not the same as marijuana.

“Hemp is an important crop which not only has proven a viable money maker in other countries, but offers so much potential for Hawaii’s struggling agricultural industry,” said State Representative Cynthia Thielen (Kailua-Kaneohe Bay), adding, “My hope is that this small Waimanalo research field will be the first step in providing our farmers with an exciting new crop which can be grown throughout our islands.”

UH sets up industrial hemp research station | KHON2

Hawaii made hemp history Friday, joining only a handful of other states in the nation to do research on hemp, set in Waimanalo.

Lawmakers, farmers and University of Hawaii officials planted the first hemp seed at the UH Waimanalo Research Station. UH will study how industrialized hemp works as part of the 2014 farm bill, which legalizes industrial hemp production for research purposes.

“Both the stalk and the seeds are valuable products,” said UH professor Harry Ako, “so we want to find out how much water we need. We don’t want to import a plant that will just dry up our whole state of water.”

“Fuel, food and fiber is what we’ve always said,” Clarence Baber of the Hawaii Farmers Union United said. “The fuel is one aspect, fiber is housing, and food is a big thing for all of us.”

Congress still needs to legalize hemp for agricultural production. Supporters of hemp say the plant has more than 25,000 uses and assure that it’s not the same as marijuana.

“Hemp is an important crop which not only has proven a viable money maker in other countries, but offers so much potential for Hawaii’s struggling agricultural industry,” said State Representative Cynthia Thielen (Kailua-Kaneohe Bay), adding, “My hope is that this small Waimanalo research field will be the first step in providing our farmers with an exciting new crop which can be grown throughout our islands.”

Article > GW kicks off PhIII trial of cannabinoid in rare epilepsy

GW Pharmaceuticals has kicked off a Phase III clinical trial of its cannabinoid Epidiolex for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a rare and severe form of childhood-onset epilepsy.

 

Although there are approved treatments available for patients with LGS, “this severe form of epilepsy often remains particularly difficult to treat,” says Justin Gover, GW’s chief executive, adding “we believe that Epidiolex has the potential to meet this significant unmet need”.

 

GW anticipates that top-line data from the 14-week, 150-patient trial, which closely follows the start of two late-stage studies assessing the drug in another rare childhood epilepsy called Dravet syndrome, will be available early next year.

 

Around 14,000-18,500 patients are estimated to suffer from LGS in the US, and 23,000-31,000 in Europe.

Marijuana Proven To Kill Cancer In Eye Opening Documentary

Share Button

Marijuana Proven To Kill Cancer In Eye Opening Documentary in5d

The most fascinating area of cannabis research revolves around an element of the marijuana plant called Cannabidiol , (CBD) a powerful antioxidant that does not produce the psychotropic effects of THC. CBD shows a unique ability to kill cancer cells in early laboratory tests.

In 2003, the United States government filed a patent on CBD as an antioxidant and neuroprotectant useful in the treatment of disease. Yet this same government continues to classify marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug with “no currently accepted medical use,” preventing doctors from studying it.

The government’s hypocritical position on CBD leaves patients like Sophie in uncharted waters, as they experimentally use an unregulated medicine that may be saving their lives.

Watch the extended trailer for this documentary below:

A MUST READ: The Marijuana Conspiracy

Share Button

RELATED ARTICLES FROM IN5D:

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

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This work by In5D is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported

Follow In5D and Body, Mind, Soul, Spirit on TSU! This social networking platform is by invitation only, so consider this YOUR invitation by clicking the link below!
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Oh God, Mom and Dad, You and Your Medical Marijuana Are So

Last night’s episode of True Life was titled “My Parents Love Their Weed.” What else do you possibly need to know?

The woman above is named Jo (her nonsmoking daughter is Heather). Brittany is Freddy’s ashamed daughter. Please don’t miss his weed music catalog, which includes the smashes, “Happy, Hungry, Sleepy,” “Only Smokes the Best,” “Can You Smell My Sack?,” and “All I Need Is Weed (Weed Weed Weed Weed).”

As always, I recommend watching the entire episode. This one is consistently lighthearted.